Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World

By Mark Twain

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...FOLLOWING
...

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... ...

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...Result
--Repentant Kanakas--Wrinkles--The Death Rate in Queensland


CHAPTER VII.
The Fiji Islands--Suva--The Ship from Duluth--Going Ashore--Midwinter in
Fiji--Seeing...

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...Drama--The Bush
--Pudding with Arsenic--Revenge--A Right Spirit but a Wrong Method--Death
of
Donga Billy


CHAPTER XXII.
Continued Description of Aboriginals--Manly...

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...Ceylon--A Lascar Crew--A Fine Ship--Three Cats and a
Basket of Kittens--Dinner Conversations--Veuve Cliquot Wine--At Anchor in
King...

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...to Save Time in Securing
Salvation


CHAPTER LII.
A Curious Way to Secure Salvation--The Banks of the Ganges--Architecture
Represents...

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...Library--Washing Decks--Pyjamas on Deck--The Cat's Toilet--No
Interest in the Bulletin--Perfect Rest--The Milky Way and the Magellan
Clouds--Mauritius--Port...

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...Ship Norman--Madeira--Arrived in Southampton





...

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...board or go without,
just as in the old forgotten Atlantic times--those Dark Ages of sea
travel.

Ours...

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...no crack of communication between them, no opening of any sort
in the solid intervening bulkhead....

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...powerful family, and could have
had a distinguished career and abundance of effective help toward it...

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...five
days I drove out the desire to smoke and was not obliged to keep watch
after...

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...a point where
medicines no longer had any helpful effect upon her. I said I...

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...on the head and
resumed my liberty.

To go back to that young Canadian. He was...

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...or two days later we
crossed the 25th parallel of north latitude, and then, by order,...

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...for his entertainment was a memory-exhibition.
The Viceroy and thirty gentlemen of his suite sat in...

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...just arrived in Washington from the Pacific coast, a
stranger and wholly unknown to the public,...

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...the great
procession. I worked my way by the suite of packed drawing-rooms, and at
the...

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...the new endings turned out to be
better than the old one. But the story...

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...and sometimes a little violent, but not often.

At last the time seemed ripe for a...

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...pulled up
the lap-robe, for he saw some one coming out of the gate--a woman; he
thought....

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... Then the next thing I said was, 'Mary Taylor, tell the hired
man to rig...

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...to my house
and----

"But who will take care of the other one?" said Mrs. Enderby....

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...pain?"

"No, madam, only weak; I am not sick, but only just weak--lately; not
long, but just...

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...getting
discouraged by this time.

Brown felt relieved, and was deeply thankful. Let him once get...

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...would find him incapable of
contriving a lie that would wash. We worked at the...

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...and other native products, and
sent them as far as South America and China; he sold...

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...separate houses. It did not allow
people to eat in either house; they must eat...

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...to a king who should do it, could properly be due
nothing but reproach; reproach softened...

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...By the time he was twelve
he hadn't a word of Kanaka left; the language had...

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...passengers belonged in Honolulu, and these were sent
ashore; but nobody could go ashore and return....

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...the same shrinkage in both, in the matter of
values.

There was nothing for us to do...

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...and its coral roads and streets were hard and smooth, and as
white as the houses....

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...for these island dwellers are indefatigable travelers.

"Nearly every house has...

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...native women rode astride, but the white
ones lacked the courage to adopt their wise custom....

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...to a doom like his. And so he put his affairs in order, and...

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... wife to abandon his wretched carcass long ago, as she herself was
...

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...the world. We entered the "doldrums" last night--variable winds,
bursts of rain, intervals of calm,...

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...of a maturer degree. One is often surprised at
the juvenilities which grown people indulge...

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...the ship is constantly interfering with skill; this makes it a
chancy game, and the element...

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...again--and landed his second disk alongside of the
first, and almost touching its right-hand side. ...

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...hold my eyes open no
longer and was about to put out the light, the great...

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...repairs; but no matter, painting was
going on all the time somewhere or other. The...

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...before, but I
was a day older now than I was then. The day they...

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... --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.

WEDNESDAY, Sept....

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... --Ane at the breast, twa at the...

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...consists of four large stars and one little one. The little one is
out of...

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...The missionaries there are French
priests.

From the multitudinous islands in these regions the "recruits" for the
Queensland...

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...own crew
being more or less hurt. It seems the...

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...children carted into exile and now
and then the grave, instead of weeping about it and...

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...or if he wants to work he can turn out
a couple of bags of copra...

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...hung round the neck. Knives,
axes, calico, and handkerchiefs are...

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...Government Agent sometimes helps them to do
it. Regulation 31 reveals two things: that sometimes...

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...how a penitent
could betaken. 'When a boy jumps overboard...

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...they are too long for reproduction here.

However, if the most a Kanaka advantages himself by...

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.... . And now we see the race of Japhet setting forth to
...

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..."2. It is felt to lower the dignity of the white agricultural
...

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...New Zealand. Somewhere or other among these myriads Samoa
is concealed, and not discoverable on...

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...for the homage of the nations, we owe her a debt of gratitude which
our hearts...

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...this, could hardly fail to do me hurt. It brought on
another cold. It...

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...rank and ancient lineage lives on, in
spite of his lost authority and the evil magic...

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...and had had brains and
known how to use them, they could have achieved the sovereignty...

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...each other; but no, there is
no crowding, even in the center of a group; and...

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...to him. And profitable, too, though
he was sometimes difficult to understand because now and...

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...just
at sundown, when the day's labor ends; all he wants is whisky and supper
and bed...

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...a kind of duck, for it has a
duck-bill and four...

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...no bird or beast of ordinary construction
could use and live....

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...on a mountain-summit, it strode ashore,
saying in its heart, 'Let...

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...today--Ornithorhynchus
Platypus Extraordinariensis--whom God preserve!"

When he was strongly moved he could...

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...first and seventeenth--and I think the reader will feel convinced
that he who wrote the one...

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...away from its
head, and the wake following behind its tail clothed in a fierce splendor
of...

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...the memorable
disaster to the Duncan Dunbar, one of the most pathetic tragedies in the
history of...

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...never grow old,
custom cannot stale it, the heart-break that is in it can never perish
out...

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...both sides between long fingers of land, high wooden ridges with sides
sloped like graves. ...

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...always work them off without any trouble in the home
market.

If the climates of the world...

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...usual. Apparently this vast continent has a really good
climate nowhere but around the edges.

If...

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...the leaves
of the trees under which we were sitting fell...

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...at the time is compelled to
seek the nearest retreat at...

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...days' confinement,
men, women, and boys were sent to this other end of the earth to...

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...a good many of them--were very bad people,
even for that day; but the most of...

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...sold to the
settlers--sold at a trifling advance upon cost. The Corps saw its
opportunity. ...

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... ...

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...there is a pleasing degree of respectful
familiarity which gives the...

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...it indicates a man whose
landfront is as long as a railroad, and whose title has...

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...dress, carriage, ways, pronunciation, inflections, or general
appearance. There were fleeting and subtle suggestions of...

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...world.

But it is hard to move a new English acquaintance when he is by himself,
or...

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...that they were implicitly believed
by all classes of Hindoos, including those of high social position...

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...man that had ever lived--for so I
called him.

...

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... without it. Shall he place his fate in the hands...

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... gate's of the city upon his shoulders, you were amazed--and also
...

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...by Govardhun to this day as proof of the might of the
...

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...I suppose it would be hard to match this in
any country. This village was...

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...the
Imperial Government at home proposes to help; and so the Imperial veto,
while a fact, is...

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...got no
employment. He had aimed high, at first, but as time and his money
wasted...

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...Is that what you mean?"

"Yes."

"Well, this is odd. You're one of those sort they...

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...I think that that
is about the word. And it isn't your proposition--no, that doesn't
fascinate...

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...gone up
fourteen per cent. in London and is still rising."

"Oh, in-deed? Now then, I've...

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...the man the shark swallowed. Swallowed him in the Thames,
without a doubt; for you...

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...the lives of
both.

The government pays a bounty for the shark; to get the bounty the
fishermen...

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...of the continent of Europe. But our baggage was weighed, and extra
weight charged for....

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...if there were
several rows of custom-fences between the coast and the East. Iron
carted across...

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...it is. It is a stuff like
tar, and is dabbed on to places where...

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...telescopes of all nations leveled at him in
unappeasable curiosity--curiosity as to which of the two...

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...perjury. I
attended one of his showy evenings in the sumptuous quarters provided for
him from...

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...stately
manorial mansion of Elizabeth's days, and that it was a house worth going
a long way...

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...should see Mr. Bascom he would tell me all about it. But he
passed from...

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...It has one
specialty; this must not be jumbled in with those other things. It...

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...blots them out. Each of them
gets attention, but not everybody's; each of them evokes...

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...and likely to hold that high place a long
time.

The next things which interest us when...

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...The war-cloud hanging black over England and America made no
trouble for me. I was...

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...Melbourne case the grounds are often
ducally spacious, and the climate and the gardeners together make...

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...of England's annual exports and imports is stated at three billions
of dollars,--[New South Wales Blue...

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...and over the border--to Buffalo, New York.

But the explanation was simple. Years ago the...

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...all appearance. One might as well walk
under water and hope to guess out a...

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... ...

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...conflagrations of vivid yellow against a background of
sober or sombre color, with a so startling...

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...a rush for the land company's shares. Immigrants soon began
to pour into the region...

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...and took it, giving thanks.

Among our passengers was an American with a unique vocation. ...

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...mountain gateway
opened, and the immense plain lay spread out below and stretching away
into dim distances...

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...2
Hussite, 1
Zoroastrians, 2
Zwinglian, 1


About 64 roads to the other world. You see how healthy...

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...be courteous to me. This one opened
his head wide and laughed like a demon;...

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...of room.

A telegraph line stretches straight up north through that 2,000 miles of
wilderness and desert...

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... The workingman is a
great power everywhere in Australia, but South Australia is his paradise.
He...

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...then the way they do go on! And finally when ushers
come and plead, and...

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...of the boomerang in perfection; that it had possibilities which
they could not master. The...

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...The 'again' was the surprise. He is
a little hard of hearing, and didn't catch...

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...in the dog-cart and we would drive to a place she knew of, and
there we...

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...spoke to you!--didn't he?'

"'Yes, it is what happened.'

"'I knew it! I couldn't hear what he...

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...my letter. I ran to him and put
it into his hands. He took...

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...excited gestures that he was betraying
to him the whole shabby business. The station-master was...

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...sailing
through the accommodating air, but encountering grass and sand and stuff
at every jump. It...

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...till the white man came with those
and his other appliances of civilization, it is quite...

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...man has always used that very
precaution. Mrs. Campbell Praed lived in Queensland, as a...

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...rustle of a wallabi, or a dingo stirring the
grass as...

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...as little above the level of brutes, and in some
cases...

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...it. In more than one country we have hunted the
savage and his little children...

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... penal colony, M. Feillet, the Governor, forcibly expropriated the
Kanaka...

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...He covers the
entire ground. He is a coward--there are a thousand fact to prove...

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...five, nor a vessel
that he could boil water in. He is the prize-curiosity of...

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...on horseback--both man and horse being of the average size.
The...

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...covered with the scratches of opossums ascending
and descending is sufficient...

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... water-hole for the night. After cooking and eating our supper, I
...

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...inch thick. It was very smooth, and partly
digested, so...

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...leg, and deep enough to allow
the wounded part to be...

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...charm and expressiveness. Our form is rude and explosive;
it is not suited to the...

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...currant-like berries ambushed among the foliage. At a
distance, in certain lights, they give the...

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...transit.

On the way we saw the usual birds--the beautiful little green parrots,
the magpie, and some...

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...who is ignorantly
trying to produce upon his farm things not suited to its soil and...

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...owns two-thirds of it; she has an income of $75,000 a month
from it, and is...

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...a cement wall six inches thick. Once a
cement water-pipe under ground at Stawell began...

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... A perfect climate.

Forty-five years ago the site now occupied by the City of Ballarat...

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...Ballarat myself,
forty-five years later--what were left of them by time and death and the
disposition to...

Page 152

...struggle for a
principle, a stand against injustice and oppression. It was the Barons
and John,...

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...the Indicator. Thirty
feet on each side of the Indicator (and down in the slate,...

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...as November flowers."

The closing clause has the seeming of a rather frosty compliment, but
that is...

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...bishop some day. Later an Archbishop. Later a
Cardinal. Finally an Archangel, I...

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... He explained this to me himself. He told me
that it was through his...

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...which his conversation showed. He was
down to date with them, too; and if he...

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... CORRIGAN CASTLE
...

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...gold pin back of it. After I had petted it, and played with it,...

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...report--a good
15,000 words, I should say,--a solid week's work. The reports were
absorbingly entertaining, long...

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...was charmed with it; it gave him something to
do. It elaborated itself on his...

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...the unhappy.
...

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...generalize a little without compromising himself, and then turn
the subject to something he was acquainted...

Page 164

...my memory, the more my
trouble grew. I found that I knew nothing about New...

Page 165

...and he said that
all he knew was that it was close to Aus----.

"We shut him...

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...blush. He said he was not worthy to sit in the company of
men like...

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...trustworthy circumstantial
evidence that no important land lay to the southward, and so did not
waste time...

Page 168

...who kill Blacks will be hanged.

Upon its several schemes the Government spent L30,000 and employed...

Page 169

...Bricklayer--that wonderful man--proposed to go out into the
wilderness, with no weapon but his tongue, and...

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...failing, ate each other, and died:

"Onward, still onward, was the order of the indomitable Robinson....

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...native Napoleon and his dreaded forces, the happy ending
of the long strife. For "that...

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...cries, as each saw in
the other's rank a loved one...

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...The Zulus who fought us in Africa, the
Maories in New...

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...wisdom he would know that his own civilization is a hell to
the savage--but he hasn't...

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...outside of the wharfboat, and all
loading and unloading was done across it, between steamer and...

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...of the writer's son, and
was of good parts and sterling character, and it begged the...

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...thousand names have gone from me. He says--he
says-hm-hmoh, dear, but it's good! Oh,...

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... You understand that tobacco
matter; you understand that I am going to take possession of...

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...fervent--

"O lord!" and saw a white linen form plunge overboard.

The youth came up coughing and...

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...and the interest of it took
their breath. They hardly uttered a whisper during two...

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...must have delighted and deeply
impressed" the early explorers. "If the rock-bound coasts, sullen,
defiant, and...

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...of a rival; but suddenly Mount Wellington, massive and
noble like his brother Etna, literally heaves...

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...it is repeated in ten
thousand islands of the Southern seas; there is a beauty of...

Page 184

...taste makes him an expensive bird to support. To get the
fat he drives his...

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...have told stirring
tales, no doubt, if they had been minded to talk; 42 of the...

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...and
imprisonment, together with extinction of his peerage; in Bluff, the cat
found with a rabbit in...

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...to New Zealand; and his house is a museum of Maori art and
antiquities. He...

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...known it and would have hunted up another caterpillar.
Not that she would have let this...

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... ...

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...sand--and loose; but they won't buy it. They want
something that will pack solid, and...

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...to Sydney."

"Ah, there it is, you see! You are going in the 5 o'clock...

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...every quarter-hour, night and day, they jingle a
tiresome chime of half a dozen notes--all the...

Page 193

... As he stepped out he said:

"Yes, you'll like Maryborough. Plenty of intelligence there....

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...had small
round holes bored through them--nobody knows how it was done; a mystery,
a lost art....

Page 195

...members of the
legislature, but they cannot be members themselves. The law extending
the suffrage to...

Page 196

...stupid; but it is not such
a dull world now, and is growing less and less...

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...act as
evidence of its vigilance in looking after the safety of the passengers
--for thugging a...

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... The
seas danced her about like a duck, but she was safe and capable.

Next morning...

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...a remarkable
paper. For brevity, succinctness, and concentration, it is perhaps
without its peer in the...

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... six hundred yards up it, which took us nearly half-an-hour to
...

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...I have shot
a man, but never choked one.' We...

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...As
regarded others he was plainly without feeling--utterly cold and
pitiless; but as regarded himself the case...

Page 203

...sweep and
variety of scenery--forests clothed in luxuriant foliage, rolling green
fields, conflagrations of flowers, receding and...

Page 204

...he sent a
cargo of it to England fifty years ago, but nothing came of the...

Page 205

...The deck was never
quiet for a moment, and seldom nearer level than a ladder, and...

Page 206

...citizen told me they don't have
teeth filled, but pull them out and put in false...

Page 207

...made you think of that?"

"I don't know."

There was no collusion. She had not seen...

Page 208

...native
race is not decreasing, but actually increasing slightly. It is another
evidence that they are...

Page 209

...high Maori or high Hindoo employ fire that had served
a man of low grade; if...

Page 210

...in the Maori war--they deserve it; but the presence of
that word detracts from the dignity...

Page 211

..."Old New Zealand" mentions a case where a
victorious army could have followed up its advantage...

Page 212

...the world in general, but not by me. I carry it with me
always--it and...

Page 213

...with pomatum; it was all
one shell. He smoked the most extraordinary cigarettes--made of some
kind...

Page 214

...the most enchanting
rearrangements of the water effects. Further along, green flats, thinly
covered with gum...

Page 215

... Where the waters of healing from Muloowurtie
...

Page 216

... And Tungkillo Kuito in sables is drest,
...

Page 217

...ever seen.
There are 81 in the list. I did not need them all, but...

Page 218

...the
sailing date, but no doubt he comes down to the dock every day and takes
a...

Page 219

...wonderful tales of the sort always to be heard in connection with new
gold diggings. ...

Page 220

...a bird which does no murder.
What was the use of getting him up in that...

Page 221

...oppressed in any
way. If our case had been the same we should not have...

Page 222

...more pleasure for
you; your attention is all on the man, just as it would be...

Page 223

...in perfect taste; never a discordant note; never
a color on any person swearing at another...

Page 224

...colors and graceful costumes; and at home we will turn out in a
storm to see...

Page 225

...city;
contains about a million inhabitants. Natives, they are, with a slight
sprinkling of white people--not...

Page 226

...Usually the
woman is a slender and shapely creature, as erect as a lightning-rod, and
she has...

Page 227

...will. It was all new, no detail of it
hackneyed. And India did not...

Page 228

...born to it and unaware that elsewhere there were other methods; but
I was also able...

Page 229

...cough. It was about nine in the evening. What a state of
things! ...

Page 230

...that he will soon turn up again as an
author or something, and be even more...

Page 231

...for it, and how I had happened to go unhanged
so long, and when would it...

Page 232

...romances connected with those princely native houses--to this
day they are always turning up, just as...

Page 233

...sense that the actuality was
the experience of an hour, at most, whereas it really covered...

Page 234

...in the case of the males. However, these are handsome times
for the farm-hand; he...

Page 235

...way: we overpraise his merits; for when it comes to
writing recommendations of servants we are...

Page 236

...to have a Spanish name
when you put it all together. How is that?"

A perplexed...

Page 237

...away and put a coolie at the work,
and explained that he would lose caste if...

Page 238

... We must part,
said I, but I hoped we should meet again in a better...

Page 239

...tremendous, and all that? Such a
personage going around calling on such as I, and...

Page 240

...deity; by earthly rank he is a prince;
not an Indian but a Persian prince. ...

Page 241

...she would
shut herself up in the zenana for life, like her mother, and by inherited
habit...

Page 242

...return the son receives the father's blessing. Our good
morning is well enough for the...

Page 243

...back to one of
the prayer-houses within the gates, to pray for the spirit of their...

Page 244

...deep well down
through the center of this mass of masonry, you would have the idea...

Page 245

...reason for their institution, but that they were
survivals whose origin none could now account for....

Page 246

...for all great and good objects. They
are a political force, and a valued support...

Page 247

...the idol symbolized a person who had become a saint or a god
through accessions of...

Page 248

...a beautiful effect.

I could have wished to start a rival exhibition there, of Christian hats
and...

Page 249

... Healthy young gentleman. Fine fresh complexion.

Sick...

Page 250

... Their size was
marvelous, and enticing to the eye, those rocks. A boy--a princeling
--was...

Page 251

...rule.
Better industries have taken their place, as this Address from the Jain
community will show:

...

Page 252

...Highness has
been pleased to introduce in your State. We...

Page 253

...were
sleeping, usually with an oil lamp present. Recurrent dead watches, it
looked like.

But at...

Page 254

...a porch and short flight of steps crowded with
dark faces and ghostly-white draperies flooded with...

Page 255

...such a place and cannot get away. That
half million fled from Bombay in a...

Page 256

...--she has touched the poor Levantine with the hem of her sleeve!
From
...

Page 257

... some people glands naturally enlarged?--would to heaven he were one!
...

Page 258

...and made
them live again; in fact, even made them believable. It was a case...

Page 259

...of facts
under which the deceased girl Cassi was murdered.

...

Page 260

... prophesied that the disease which Ramji was suffering from would not
...

Page 261

...and my mother took part in killing the girl.
After the...

Page 262

... Tookaram's younger brother, and myself. On reaching the seashore,
...

Page 263

...if any one was there, and I replied that I could see no one
...

Page 264

...where he
is describing some effects which followed the temporary paralysis of
Hastings' powerful government brought about...

Page 265

... There are some particular
districts which are noted as marts...

Page 266

...it to the swindler's brother, exacting a
heavy pre-payment of interest...

Page 267

...most of them!

There is the Plague, the Black Death: India invented it; India is the
cradle...

Page 268

...there are
eighty nations and several hundred governments, fighting and quarreling
must be the common business of...

Page 269

...be used in sleeping
berths in the trains; in private houses sometimes; and in nine-tenths of
the...

Page 270

...leglets,
and armlets, these things constituting all their wealth, no doubt. These
silent crowds sat there...

Page 271

...one with you--and you would be sure
to have towels, because you buy them with the...

Page 272

...Then they
closed the communicating door, nimbly tidied up our place, put the
night-clothing on the beds...

Page 273

...work; there was no lost time. We were soon
outside and moving swiftly through the...

Page 274

...through, belting right and left with his trunk, how
do these swarms of people get out...

Page 275

...as a ship gets up over a wave; and after that, as he strides
monstrously about,...

Page 276

...every day, instead of once or
twice a year.

The prince is an educated gentleman. His...

Page 277

...beginning to tell.
It had a long nose, and floppy ears that hung down, and a...

Page 278

...a dog like that, but only to know the secret of its
birth.

I think he was...

Page 279

...known to be the largest and finest of his species
in the world. I read...

Page 280

...swept apart by the crowd, somebody detained me with
a moment's talk, and we did not...

Page 281

...him. Are ye in the business?"

"What business?"

"The show business."

A fatal question. I recognized...

Page 282

...his hat from its peg and danced on it with joy,
shouting:

"Ye've hardly missed it the...

Page 283

...of Augustin Daly's back door.




CHAPTER XLVI.

If the desire to kill and the opportunity to kill...

Page 284

... It was the
Augean Stables over again. Captain Vallancey, writing in a Madras
journal in...

Page 285

...corpse. Men were initiated into
the sect with solemn ceremonies. Then they were taught...

Page 286

...Other people had to have interpreters at every turn, but
not the Thugs; they could talk...

Page 287

...beside them and
engage them in conversation, and certain expert stranglers to stand
behind the travelers and...

Page 288

...Nerbudda; at a village called Hutteea, murdered a Hindoo.

"Went through...

Page 289

...in the protection of his sacredness. In the middle of a
tally-sheet of Feringhea's, who...

Page 290

...so many,
many, many lagging years! And then comes a sense of injury: you don't
know...

Page 291

...strolling
players, and persuaded them to come with us, on the...

Page 292

...fired by an
eager impulse to contribute to a charity, wait, and count forty. To...

Page 293

...I, Ramzam, set out from Kotdee in the
cold weather and...

Page 294

...case! and how watery and poor is the
zeal and how childish the endurance of those...

Page 295

...well. After this we returned to our homes,
having been...

Page 296

...would not sit." No, not
that--it was too awful to think of!

There are a number...

Page 297

...tremendous record in India. "I went to the house where Buhram slept
(often has he...

Page 298

... old."

There it stops. What did they do with those poor little fellows? ...

Page 299

... that she would relieve him from the obligations of the milk with
...

Page 300

...four of them confessed to above 300 murders;
another to nearly 400; our friend Ramzam to...

Page 301

...pretending to know nothing about its doings;
and this condition of things had existed for generations,...

Page 302

...ready to travel.

However, no explanation of such a system can make it seem quite rational
to...

Page 303

...long train,
for all the natives of India were going by it somewhither, and the native
officials...

Page 304

...all?"

"No. The guard found a place for me that had been engaged and not
occupied....

Page 305

...theory which tries to explain, but never quite does it to your
satisfaction. You can...

Page 306

...man who assisted; and he
placed a police guard to see that no one did so....

Page 307

...would
enable her to sustain life till that was given, though she dared not eat
or drink....

Page 308

...pain."

Sleeman was now satisfied that he could not alter her purpose. He sent
for all...

Page 309

...upon whom it was to
fall to drown the voice and keep them in ignorance of...

Page 310

...pyjamas, and led a rational
and comfortable life thenceforth.

Out in the country in India, the day...

Page 311

...and this gave the village the aspect of a mouldering and hoary
ruin. I believe...

Page 312

...of this prospective ruin which made the killing of
girl-babies so prevalent in India in the...

Page 313

...and if any other member
presumes to sweep within that range,...

Page 314

...the water-sack is made of; it would defile him.
And it doesn't allow him to eat...

Page 315

...trees. Even the photographer and the prosperous
merchant ply their industries in the elegant reserve...

Page 316

...but rolls himself up head and ears in
his blanket and stretches himself on the veranda,...

Page 317

...the very thing.

In the early brightness we made a long drive out to the Fort....

Page 318

...die on the road, from age and fatigue and disease and scanty
nourishment, and how many...

Page 319

...the rivers, towns of tents were visible, with a multitude of
fluttering pennons, and a mighty...

Page 320

...holiness. There was a change of cars about
mid-afternoon at Moghul-serai--if that was the name--and...

Page 321

...met with a prompt declination at the hands of those who were
authorized to speak for...

Page 322

...doorspace to keep
out the glare of the sun. Still, there is plenty of privacy,...

Page 323

...rind was said to exude a stench of so atrocious a nature that
when a dorian...

Page 324

...ago, and after that it was Buddhist during many
centuries--twelve, perhaps--but the Brahmins got the upper...

Page 325

...Roman Catholic power dying, upon these
same terms, for many centuries. Many a time we...

Page 326

...across the
sharply-defined line which separates it from the rest of the globe, you
stand upon ineffably...

Page 327

...see how
handy the system is, how convenient, how comprehensive. If you go to
Benares with...

Page 328

...sewage.
Drink as much of it as you want. It is for fever.

5. Smallpox. ...

Page 329

...come out young, fresh, elastic, and full of eagerness
for the new race of life. ...

Page 330

...through propitiation of the Great Fate
--these are all good. But you must do something...

Page 331

...there also you will
see a very uncommon thing--an image of Shiva. You have seen...

Page 332

... Therefore he goes to the Briddhkal Temple and
secures Youth and long life by bathing...

Page 333

...an aversion to being
turned into a Hindoo. One could understand that he could lose...

Page 334

...bluff
itself; all the long face of it is compactly walled from sight by this
crammed perspective...

Page 335

... Ten steps below that place stood a crowd of men, women, and
comely young maidens...

Page 336

...infallibly made pure and clean whatsoever thing touched
it. They still believe it, and that...

Page 337

...He was there to burn his
father. He was given a torch, and while he...

Page 338

...few time-worn stones which are
remembrances of the suttee. Each has a rough carving upon...

Page 339

...great Mosque of Aurangzeb. They
seem to be always in sight, from everywhere, those airy,...

Page 340

...of Instability.
Those creations in stone were only a kind of water pictures, after all.

A prominent...

Page 341

...of courage, now, and they broke into
the fort and massacred the helpless soldiers and their...

Page 342

...steadily storing them up in your
heart day by day and year by year all your...

Page 343

...and decades of centuries, and one that is full of risks, too,
like the accident of...

Page 344

...in a noble great garden in Benares, all meet and proper
to his stupendous rank. ...

Page 345

...with the arid life he had led as hermit and beggar,
could account for that. ...

Page 346

...the Court of the Viceroy of India, twenty years ago. He
was an able man,...

Page 347

...crank, and that settles it. I mean it does nowadays,
because now we can't burn...

Page 348

...whose life was the light of the world to him; in it her
ashes lie, and...

Page 349

...political, commercial; rich in the results of the
miracles done by that brace of mighty magicians,...

Page 350

...apparent ease, and without noticeable friction, through
tact, training, and distinguished administrative ability, reinforced by
just and...

Page 351

... It is
strange. Just as it stood, it was itself a monument; a ready-made...

Page 352

...the
stolen perspiration that saved his life. From the middle of Mr.
Holwell's narrative I will...

Page 353

...but the props and pressure equally sustaining me all around.
The...

Page 354

...force my way. I
was at this time sensible of...

Page 355

...Indian antiquities.
Indeed, a person might spend half a year among the beautiful and
wonderful things without...

Page 356

...the Ganges.

February 15. Up with the sun. A brilliant morning, and frosty. ...

Page 357

... From many a palmy plain,
...

Page 358

...public street of Marienbad to-day, I saw an old, bent,
gray-headed...

Page 359

... force that they knocked up the water like pebble-splashes.

...

Page 360

...blended with the deluge and lost to
sight.

...

Page 361

...first tiger hunt. I killed thirteen. We were
presently away again, and the train...

Page 362

...the forty miles of steep road from the valley to
their mountain homes, with tall baskets...

Page 363

...I was not acquainted with the horses, any way. I got a pipe
and a...

Page 364

... --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.

On Monday and Tuesday at sunrise we...

Page 365

... Indeed, there was but one questionable detail
left: the regular train was to follow us...

Page 366

...There was abundance of time. We
did not need to hamper the train; if it...

Page 367

...ancient
historical work of art was defective, I thought, but as a wild and
barbarous spectacle the...

Page 368

...not mind his other notes, but when he camps near enough for you to
hear that...

Page 369

...Nothing seems to have been forgotten, nothing over
looked. Always, when you think you have...

Page 370

...by scoring 917. He is
always sure of his average. Anyone who bets that...

Page 371

...bets that in
India in any three consecutive years, the snakes will kill 53,500
persons, will lose...

Page 372

...but it got well;
everyone was surprised. This could not happen twice in ten years,
perhaps....

Page 373

... ...

Page 374

...of that battle of
Clive's which founded the British Indian Empire, the British power would
be overthrown...

Page 375

...of our late homes. We reached the caravanserai at
Chattapore...

Page 376

... the drummer's wife eating chupatties, and asked her to give a...

Page 377

...face in my
dress, for there was no earth to bury...

Page 378

...wisdom, short of everything but courage and
devotion to duty. The defense of that open...

Page 379

...palkee, head-foremost, the trooper gave him a
cut with his sword...

Page 380

...its impetuous way through hostile forces, winning victory after
victory, but still striding on and on,...

Page 381

... clothing worth taking were stripped. Some of the women were alive.
...

Page 382

...outraged earth have straightway hidden. The inner apartment was
ankle-deep...

Page 383

...is
reviewing has retold them to him.

I have made the quoted remark myself, at one time...

Page 384

...of Lucknow--began. Sir Henry
was killed three days later, and Brigadier Inglis succeeded him in
command.

Outside...

Page 385

...its way through the
city against odds of a hundred to one, and entered the Residency;...

Page 386

...the long siege of Lucknow was ended.

The last eight or ten miles of Sir Colin...

Page 387

... Stern silence was kept, and the enemy took
no alarm."

Lady...

Page 388

...I was able to imagine the fiery storm that raged night
and day over the place...

Page 389

...feet, and whether
to eat him alone or invite friends. He and his prey were...

Page 390

...hand, and work for nothing, and do the
bulk of it at that.

I will begin with...

Page 391

...at
its extremity into a pointed spire crowned by a crescent....

Page 392

...the gateway. On its top the
Hindu brackets and monolithic...

Page 393

... white marble rises around the two tombs, or rather cenotaphs of the
...

Page 394

...done in gems is very brilliant
(followed by a most important modification which the reader is...

Page 395

...its describers, by help of my imagination, and
substitute for it the Taj of fact. ...

Page 396

...had
never seen it mentioned in any book. That is strange. And I, myself,
was...

Page 397

...miracle, the miracle
without its fellow in the earth; a gust of wind sets every branch...

Page 398

...clothed
in fire.

These describers are writing for the "general," and so, in order to make
sure of...

Page 399

...way or take the consequences. I am used to being afraid of
collisions when I...

Page 400

...scare at all;
they jumped into the room and threw yellow paint all over him from...

Page 401

...loosely stacked in its veranda, and a detachment of the parents
wedged among them, smoking the...

Page 402

...pleasant, saluted with
soldierly grace, said "Wair good," and did it again next day.

He was always...

Page 403

...I regret his loss, and wish I
had him back; but they--it is different with them....

Page 404

...made his parting salute, and went out from us to return no
more forever. Dear...

Page 405

...was always India in motion, always a
streaming flood of brown people clothed in smouchings from...

Page 406

...lines of roofs were
crowded with people, and each crowd was an explosion of brilliant color.

Then...

Page 407

...must pronounce
it Punjawb). The handwriting was excellent, and the wording was English
--English, and yet...

Page 408

... the other hand, it has made them less contented with their lot in
...

Page 409

...native
beggar-girl embarrassed me by calling me father, although I knew she was
mistaken. I was...

Page 410

...death,
in plain English he passed through the gates of Grave,...

Page 411

...resume his studies
till morning is puzzling.

I think it is because he is studying history. ...

Page 412

...of acquiring history
before he had had a single lesson in the art of acquiring it,...

Page 413

...were students present who
justified their teacher's wisdom in introducing them to these studies;
but the fact...

Page 414

...could discover America.

"The Indian wars were very desecrating to the country.

"The Indians pursued their warfare...

Page 415

...Fayrer, and Nilmadhub Mookerjee and others; they
did
what they could do,...

Page 416

...was plain that no one at the table
doubted this statement.

By and by, in the course...

Page 417

...do seem to run remarkably to pets. Our host in Cawnpore had
a fine collection...

Page 418

...shadow froze fast to the deck and
had to be ripped loose by main strength. ...

Page 419

...are a storm which has passed and left a deep calm behind. The
people group...

Page 420

...them to me last night. It was
small and faint and delicate, and looked like...

Page 421

...It was that story that made Mauritius known
to the world, made the name familiar to...

Page 422

...council is French, and in all ordinary matters of
legislation they...

Page 423

...an American, but he is dead or mislaid. The mongrels are the
...

Page 424

...no proof-reader now; he is dead.

"Where do they get matter...

Page 425

...every year in Mauritius. No
other book is so popular here except the Bible. ...

Page 426

...civilization of New Guinea
and the like, the snatching of Madagascar and the laying on of...

Page 427

...fact, in our day
land-robbery, claim-jumping, is become a European governmental frenzy.
Some have been hard at...

Page 428

...the
change.

April 23. "The first year they gather shells; the second year they
gather shells and...

Page 429

...the
uncomely and apparently frail blocks standing. Everywhere in its track
it annihilated houses, tore off...

Page 430

...combined. It affects one's emotions as
parks and gardens affect them. The surfaces of...

Page 431

...cost much to repair them,
and it seems inexcusable neglect to leave them as they are.

It...

Page 432

...in the moonlight till 3 A.M. Good fun and
wholesome. And the songs were...

Page 433

...moon spying from
behind a rag of black cloud; the remote top of the mizzenmast shearing...

Page 434

...allover
--indolence, piousness, poverty, impotence.

Crews of small boats and tugs, all jet black woolly heads and...

Page 435

...a "card." He suggested
Jumbo. Jamrach said he would have to think of something else--Jumbo
couldn't...

Page 436

...In America we know how to value anything that Shakespeare's touch
has made holy. You'll see."

In...

Page 437

...to buy it. The proposition was entertained, and a price named
--$50,000, I think; but...

Page 438

...bangs;
I forget what they were about. Then lots of shouting back and forth,
among the...

Page 439

... Residences all along, set in the midst of green lawns with shrubs
and generally one...

Page 440

...people are a little nervous about having him come back, and
they may well be, for...

Page 441

...and the rest go silently to bed at 8; and in the
dark, too; there is...

Page 442

...and educating and
teaching wage-yielding mechanical trades to 1,200 boys and girls.
Protestant Missionary work is coldly...

Page 443

...ends the
preceding chapter, it was meant to indicate, in an extravagant form, two
things: the conflicting...

Page 444

...that the
Uitlanders (strangers, foreigners) paid thirteen-fifteenths of the
Transvaal taxes, yet got little or nothing for...

Page 445

...the town, concealed in oil tanks and coal cars, and had
begun to form and drill...

Page 446

...unification and consolidation of all the South African States
into one imposing commonwealth or empire under...

Page 447

...a new government, some wanted the existing
one reformed; apparently very few wanted the revolution to...

Page 448

...went over a cable.

The new poet laureate lost no time. He came out with...

Page 449

...him.
...

Page 450

...he had in his
possession a printed document proclaiming a new government and naming its
president--one of...

Page 451

...hours later--a thing not conceivable to me--I should
have retired him by force; for at that...

Page 452

...shone in the heavens," the
Transvaal would be and remain English territory. And also in...

Page 453

...Ingogo heights, and there fought a battle which lasted
from noon till nightfall. He then...

Page 454

... Mr. Garrett's account of the Raid is much the best one I have
met with,...

Page 455

... His
lads had fought valorously, but had not been able to get near enough to...

Page 456

...detail in which the Raid-episode exactly repeats history.
By surrender at Bronkhorst, the whole British force...

Page 457

...show that
there was a defect somewhere. It was not in the absence of courage....

Page 458

...very carefully concealing a smile--excuses the presence
of the Maxims by saying that they were of...

Page 459

...done? In 21
hours of industrious fighting, Jameson's 530 men, with 8 Maxims, 3
cannon, and...

Page 460

...a city of a hundred
thousand inhabitants, counting white and black together; and not the
ordinary mining...

Page 461

...in his habits, hospitable, honest in his dealings with the
whites, a hard master to his...

Page 462

...intruder and overlooking the Boer? Yes.

The Uitlander seems to have expected something very different from...

Page 463

...race and struggle, and are dropping one by one
into the grip of the usurer--getting hopelessly...

Page 464

...swift suffocation; the nameless but right-hearted
Australian pioneer humanely reduced his overplus of aboriginal neighbors
by a...

Page 465

...would intrude, looking wholly out of place, and
spoil it all, making the thing a grating...

Page 466

...ought to be
hanged, and asked the station-master if it could be arranged. He said
no;...

Page 467

...they had been without shelter from rain and sun. He said that
one day the...

Page 468

...that they were not
discovered five thousand years ago and made familiar to the African world
for...

Page 469

...steep grade with a
diamond as large as a football, and he laid aside his occupations...

Page 470

... The Cape got the territory, but no profit;
for Mr. Rhodes and the Rothschilds and...

Page 471

...a plowed field.
Exposure for a length of time make the rock easier to work than...

Page 472

...work again.

That great diamond weighs 97l carats. Some say it is as big as...

Page 473

...day's mining is brought every day, and, weighed, assorted,
valued, and deposited in safes against shipping-day....

Page 474

...Cape of Good Hope, his shadow falls to the Zambesi.
He is the only colonial in...

Page 475

...with despair
at every rumor that the Charter is to be annulled. He raids and...

Page 476

...military surgeon who came out to the Cape fifty years ago
with his regiment. He...

Page 477

...voyage to England occupied a short fortnight, without a
stop except at Madeira. A good...