Essays on Paul Bourget

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...ESSAYS ON PAUL BOURGET

by Mark Twain



CONTENTS:

WHAT PAUL BOURGET THINKS OF...

Page 1

...for his great work is
completed, and as a result he intimately knows every bug and...

Page 2

...and would
have been very good sugar indeed if it had been screened. Yes, they are
pleased;...

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...has
been absorbing during twenty-five years. How much of his competency is
derived from conscious "observation"? The...

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...in its
vices and its virtues,...

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...religious drift, or
sporting drift, or conversational style or complexion, or cut of face,
but there are...

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...we say. It was a jest--to be
plain, it was a series of frauds. To my...

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...once. Adds it, and labels it with this
innocent comment:

...

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...of the nation where they are found. I wonder what they are.
Perhaps one of them...

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... to arts and luxury, and to debauchery, all the powers and all
...

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...Southern States; so
there you have a prodigious region where the rush for sudden wealth is
almost...

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...the corruptor; and here was the question: What is it
that protects her?

It seems quite unlikely...

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...of truth-seeking--hunting for
it in out-of-the-way places--was new; but that was an error. I
remember that when...

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...anecdotes about literature or literary
people? I am not able to answer that. Perhaps the original...

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...turn in and see if he can't find out who
his father was!"

Well, you should have...

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...it wanders around; that it loses itself early
and does not find itself any more. There...

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...such a venture. It would be too immodest.
Also too gratuitously generous. And a shade too...

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...Maybe so, maybe so; but it will only be a shower, I think.

Shouter. No, no,...

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...a serious study of your country and of
your countrymen, I warn you that your world-wide...

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...useful partners, friends, and
confidants, who should always keep men under their wholesome
influence by their diplomacy,...

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...of our young and gifted; and she sets over us the ablest
masters in the world...

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...us to do it, because they think
that such words sully their pages. This present magazine...

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...of being entertained
by the members of the old aristocracy of England. If it may interest
you,...

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...Balzac? Has he read Victor Hugo's
'Les Miserables' and 'Notre Dame de Paris'? Has he read...

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...powers and all the weaknesses of
the French soul."

You see? Your "higher Parisian" class--not everybody, not...

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...it hadn't had point. I judged from your remark
about the diligence and industry of the...