Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...ADVENTURES

OF

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

(Tom Sawyer's Comrade)

By Mark Twain

Complete




CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I. Civilizing Huck.--Miss Watson.--Tom Sawyer Waits.

CHAPTER II. The Boys...

Page 1

...the Lamp

! ! ! !

Judge Thatcher surprised

Jim Listening

"Pap"

Huck and his Father

Reforming the Drunkard

Falling from Grace

The...

Page 2

...Sawyer wounded

The Doctor speaks for Jim

Tom rose square up in Bed

"Hand out them Letters"

Out of...

Page 3

...other names, too, but she never meant no harm by
it. She put me in them...

Page 4

... All I wanted
was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular.
 She...

Page 5

...sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared
and most shook the...

Page 6

...you ain't
sleepy--if you are anywheres where it won't do for you to scratch, why
you will...

Page 7

...stirred a little, but he didn't wake.
Afterwards Jim said the witches be witched him and...

Page 8

...and a half,
to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore.

We went to a...

Page 9

...never find him these days.  He
used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tanyard,...

Page 10

...them, ready to shoot them down if they move a peg?"

"A guard!  Well, that _is_...

Page 11

...greased up and clayey, and I was
dog-tired.




CHAPTER III.

WELL, I got a good going-over in the...

Page 12

...wanted me, though I couldn't make out how he was
a-going to be any better off...

Page 13

...with di'monds, and they didn't have only a guard
of four hundred soldiers, and so we...

Page 14

...iron ring, and then the genies
come tearing in, with the thunder and lightning a-ripping around...

Page 15

...table up to six
times seven is thirty-five, and I don't reckon I could ever get...

Page 16

... There was a cross in the left
boot-heel made with big nails, to keep off the...

Page 17

...no use; he said it wouldn't talk. He said sometimes it
wouldn't talk without money.  I...

Page 18

...don't run no
resk, 'kase it's down in de bills dat you's gwyne to git hung."

When...

Page 19

...you hear?  I'll learn people to bring up a boy to put on airs
over his...

Page 20

...what you want it for--you just shell it
out."

He took it and bit it to see...

Page 21

...be ashamed of, and he hoped the
judge would help him and not look down on...

Page 22

...law trial was a
slow business--appeared like they warn't ever going to get started on it;
so...

Page 23

...you all the
time.  I didn't want to go back no more.  I had stopped cussing,...

Page 24

...time, and Judge
Thatcher knowed how to do it. And he said people allowed there'd be
another...

Page 25

...swig or two and got sort of
warmed up, and went to ripping again.  He had...

Page 26

...and a
silver-headed cane--the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the State.  And
what do you think?  They...

Page 27

...he went in the dirt, and
rolled there, and held his toes; and the cussing he...

Page 28

...all fours and crawled off, begging them to let him
alone, and he rolled himself up...

Page 29

...sprinkling of
bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise.  I reckoned I would...

Page 30

...about
wore out, I got to thinking that if I could fix up some way to...

Page 31

...any, only the one out
at the woodpile, and I knowed why I was going to...

Page 32

...my jacket (so he couldn't
drip) till I got a good piece below the house and...

Page 33

...I was for a minute.  I set up and looked
around, a little scared.  Then I...

Page 34

...waked up another fellow and told him, and
laughed, but he didn't laugh; he ripped out...

Page 35

...or two holes, but mostly it was big trees
all about, and gloomy in there amongst...

Page 36

...log, munching
the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and very well satisfied.  And
then something struck me....

Page 37

...up.  But they didn't yet a while.  They turned around
the foot of the island and...

Page 38

...waited for to look
further, but uncocked my gun and went sneaking back on my tiptoes...

Page 39

...sleep didn't
do me no good.  By and by I says to myself, I can't live...

Page 40

...do nuffn to Ole Jim, 'at 'uz
awluz yo' fren'."

Well, I warn't long making him understand...

Page 41

...Jim."

"Well, I b'lieve you, Huck.  I--_I run off_."

"Jim!"

"But mind, you said you wouldn' tell--you know...

Page 42

...de evenin'.
De yuther servants wouldn' miss me, kase dey'd shin out en take holiday
soon as...

Page 43

...could a body do it in de night?
 En I warn't gwyne to show mysef on...

Page 44

...agin.  Wunst I had
foteen dollars, but I tuck to specalat'n', en got busted out."

"What did...

Page 45

...see what wuz gwyne to
come of it."

"Well, what did come of it, Jim?"

"Nuffn never come...

Page 46

...flat and a
good place to build a fire on.  So we built it there and...

Page 47

...if the sun was blazing outside.  We
went winding in and out amongst the trees, and...

Page 48

...ignorantest kind of words and pictures made with charcoal.
 There was two old dirty calico dresses,...

Page 49

...talk about the dead man and guess out how he
come to be killed, but Jim...

Page 50

...comes there and curls around it.  Jim told
me to chop off the snake's head and...

Page 51

...rabbit and set it and catch a catfish that was
as big as a man, being...

Page 52

...was a light burning in a
little shanty that hadn't been lived in for a long...

Page 53

...what
was going on in the town; but by and by she dropped on to pap...

Page 54

...he'll be all right.  You can't prove
anything on him, you know; everything will be quieted...

Page 55

...can slip around through the woods and hunt up
his camp fire all the better for...

Page 56

...and she put the hank over them, and
went on talking about her and her husband's...

Page 57

...I met at daybreak this morning, just as I was going to turn
into the woods...

Page 58

...Williams George Elexander Peters, and if you get into trouble
you send word to Mrs. Judith...

Page 59

...seem to go mighty slow.  If a boat was to come
along we was going to...

Page 60

...some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug
wigwam to get under...

Page 61

...other
stuff to eat; and sometimes I lifted a chicken that warn't roosting
comfortable, and took him...

Page 62

...hat hanging on the back of it,
when the flashes come.

Well, it being away in the...

Page 63

...captain's door, which was open, and by Jimminy, away down
through the texas-hall we see a...

Page 64

...of blubbering.

Packard didn't take no notice of that, but hung up his lantern on a...

Page 65

...considerble sight better 'n killin' of him.
 I'm unfavorable to killin' a man as long as...

Page 66

...he jerked it in again, and says:

"Heave that blame lantern out o' sight, Bill!"

He flung...

Page 67

...begun to storm again,
and this time worse than ever.  The rain poured down, and never...

Page 68

...life's the life for me, and I'm derned if
_I'd_ live two mile out o' town,...

Page 69

...I will; but
who in the dingnation's a-going' to _pay_ for it?  Do you reckon your
pap--"

"Why...

Page 70

...it was a thousand mile off.  By the time I
got there the sky was beginning...

Page 71

...sp--Sh!--d' you hear a noise?"

We skipped out and looked; but it warn't nothing but the...

Page 72

...yo' pints.  I reck'n I
knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain' no sense...

Page 73

...dat."

"Shucks, it ain't calling you anything.  It's only saying, do you know
how to talk French?"

"Well,...

Page 74

...stern, and grabbed the paddle
and set her back a stroke.  But she didn't come.  I...

Page 75

...off to the left and shot by, amongst a lot of snags that fairly
roared, the...

Page 76

...no sign of a whoop nowheres.  I reckoned Jim had fetched up on a
snag, maybe,...

Page 77

... Why, what in the nation do you mean?  I hain't been gone
anywheres.  Where would I...

Page 78

...must
start in and "'terpret" it, because it was sent for a warning.  He said
the first...

Page 79

...to take it back.

It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go...

Page 80

...again, and went to watching, same as before.  Jim said it made him
all over trembly...

Page 81

...to hear such talk.  He wouldn't ever dared to talk such
talk in his life before....

Page 82

...them says:

"What's that yonder?"

"A piece of a raft," I says.

"Do you belong on it?"

"Yes, sir."

"Any...

Page 83

...be long after sun-up then, and when you ask for help you tell them
your folks...

Page 84

...was a-listenin' to all de talk, en I slips into de river en was gwyne
to...

Page 85

...we couldn't
take the raft up the stream, of course.  There warn't no way but to...

Page 86

...to be sheering off a bit.  She
was a big one, and she was coming in...

Page 87

...do you want?"

"I don't want nothing, sir.  I only want to go along by, but...

Page 88

...men to come in with their guns, and
they all went in a big parlor that...

Page 89

...rabbit he had catched in the woods
day before yesterday, and he asked me where Moses...

Page 90

...I
went to bed with Buck, and when I waked up in the morning, drat it...

Page 91

... There was a couple of big wild-turkey-wing fans spread out
behind those things.  On the table...

Page 92

...and had a dead bird
laying on its back in her other hand with its heels...

Page 93

...This is what she wrote about a boy by the name
of Stephen Dowling Bots that...

Page 94

...she was
alive, and it didn't seem right that there warn't nobody to make some
about her...

Page 95

...life he put on a clean shirt and a full suit from head
to foot made...

Page 96

...but it was a different kind.  She was
gentle and sweet like a dove, and she...

Page 97

...that shooting from behind a bush.  Why didn't you step
into the road, my boy?"

"The Shepherdsons...

Page 98

...a lonesome place he hears a horse a-coming behind
him, and sees old Baldy Shepherdson a-linkin'...

Page 99

...on the grass in the sun sound asleep.  I went up
to our room, and judged...

Page 100

...this thing, and pretty soon
I noticed that my nigger was following along behind.  When we...

Page 101

...here sooner, Jim?"

"Well, 'twarn't no use to 'sturb you, Huck, tell we could do sumfn--but
we's...

Page 102

...was
up and gone. Well, I gets up, a-wondering, and goes down stairs--nobody
around; everything as still...

Page 103

...started
riding towards the store; then up gets one of the boys, draws a steady
bead over...

Page 104

...ain't a-going to tell _all_ that happened--it would make
me sick again if I was to...

Page 105

...as Jack
comes agin en tells me for certain you _is_ dead.  Lawsy, I's mighty
glad to...

Page 106

...black streaks--rafts; sometimes you could hear a sweep screaking; or
jumbled up voices, it was so...

Page 107

...feel crawly; it was like spirits carrying on that way in the air.
 Jim said he...

Page 108

...two or
three hours the shores was black--no more sparks in the cabin windows.
 These sparks was...

Page 109

...and the first thing that come out
was that these chaps didn't know one another.

"What got...

Page 110

...and be degraded
down into such company."  And he begun to wipe the corner of his...

Page 111

...we would, if he would tell us how.  He said we
ought to bow when we...

Page 112

...all could do him any good; though he said it often made him feel
easier and...

Page 113

...of pap, I learnt
that the best way to get along with his kind of people...

Page 114

...about in a shuck
tick, and they poke into you and hurt; and when you roll...

Page 115

...constant
that we could see them plenty soon enough to throw her head this way or
that...

Page 116

...that strike you?"

"I'm in, up to the hub, for anything that will pay, Bilgewater; but,...

Page 117

...little bit of a concern, up over a carpenter shop--carpenters and
printers all gone to the...

Page 118

...this way and
that, shouting, "It's the brazen serpent in the wilderness!  Look upon
it and live!"...

Page 119

...of the race, and that dear preacher
there, the truest friend a pirate ever had!"

And then...

Page 120

...and knocked down the
price as low as he could afford it, and was going to...

Page 121

...says he, "dat's all right, den.  I doan' mine one er two kings,
but dat's enough....

Page 122

...one volume--but I reckon I can piece it out
from memory.  I'll just walk up and...

Page 123

...and was excited, it was perfectly lovely the way he
would rip and tear and rair...

Page 124

...on
at different times; and they leaned every which-way, and had gates that
didn't generly have but...

Page 125

...the tobacco looks mournful at it
when it's handed back, and says, sarcastic:

"Here, gimme the _chaw_,...

Page 126

...somebody sings out:

"Here comes old Boggs!--in from the country for his little old monthly
drunk; here...

Page 127

...rode off
blackguarding Sherburn as loud as he could yell, all down the street;
and pretty soon...

Page 128

...jammed one another, with
their necks stretched, trying to see, and people on the inside trying...

Page 129

...and sung
out, "Boggs!" and then fetched his cane down slow to a level, and says
"Bang!"...

Page 130

...friendless cast-out women that come along
here, did that make you think you had grit enough...

Page 131

...up across his left arm and cocking
it when he says this.

The crowd washed back sudden,...

Page 132

...circus they done the most astonishing things; and
all the time that clown carried on so...

Page 133

...just stood up there, a-sailing around as easy and comfortable
as if he warn't ever drunk...

Page 134

...play the main principal part in it;
and at last when he'd got everybody's expectations up...

Page 135

...down the middle of the river, and
fetch her in and hide her about two mile...

Page 136

...in that
three nights.  I never see money hauled in by the wagon-load like that
before.  By...

Page 137

...did he do?  He collared it.
 S'pose he contracted to do a thing, and you paid...

Page 138

...Johnny! it's
mighty hard; I spec' I ain't ever gwyne to see you no mo', no...

Page 139

...spoke to the duke, and said he hoped it wouldn't take but a few
hours, because...

Page 140

...profitable way--meaning the devil, I reckon.  We had all
bought store clothes where we stopped last;...

Page 141

...him, are you?"

"No, my name's Blodgett--Elexander Blodgett--_Reverend_ Elexander
Blodgett, I s'pose I must say, as I'm...

Page 142

...is the others?"

"Mary Jane's nineteen, Susan's fifteen, and Joanna's about
fourteen--that's the one that gives herself...

Page 143

...got back with the duke we hid the canoe, and then they set down on...

Page 144

...all
sorts of kind things to them, and carried their carpet-bags up the hill
for them, and...

Page 145

...they done.  And, mind you, everybody
was doing the same; and the place was that damp...

Page 146

...in his letters; and so he will
name the same, to wit, as follows, vizz.:--Rev. Mr....

Page 147

...brothers to a rich dead man and
representatives of furrin heirs that's got left is the...

Page 148

...that's left behind in the vale of sorrers.  He has done generous by
these yer poor...

Page 149

...writes on a little scrap of paper,
"_Obsequies_, you old fool," and folds it up, and...

Page 150

...one that wants to protect you and keep you out of
harm and trouble, to turn...

Page 151

...made out of calico that hung down to the floor.  There was an
old hair trunk...

Page 152

...the sea _baths_--that's what I said."

"Well, then, how's he going to take the sea baths...

Page 153

...church?"

"Nor church."

"But _you_ always went to church."

Well, I was gone up again.  I forgot I...

Page 154

...lovely
again--which was her way; but when she got done there warn't hardly
anything left o' poor...

Page 155

...to paw around there.  But I see I couldn't do nothing
without a candle, and I...

Page 156

...valid, and it 'll all
go back to the estate.  These yer orphans 'll git their...

Page 157

...the
house a good ransacking:  I knowed that very well.  Then I turned in,
with my clothes...

Page 158

...it is, all right; because
when we get down the river a hundred mile or two...

Page 159

...comfortable,
and making no more sound than a cat.  He never spoke; he moved people
around, he...

Page 160

...no more popular man in town than
what that undertaker was.

Well, the funeral sermon was very...

Page 161

...property for auction straight off--sale two days after the funeral;
but anybody could buy private beforehand...

Page 162

...is, I don't think I ever see them
all come _out_ at once but just one...

Page 163

...and we _wouldn't_ if I could a got
my advice listened to."

The king sassed back as...

Page 164

...tells
the truth when he is in a tight place is taking considerable many resks,
though I...

Page 165

...and flung in the river!"

Says I:

"Cert'nly.  But do you mean _before_ you go to Mr....

Page 166

...nostrils spread and her eyes snap when she said
it, too.

"If I get away I sha'n't...

Page 167

...nor nobody in this town; if a neighbor was
to ask how is your uncles this...

Page 168

...door, and I was
mighty sorry for you, Miss Mary Jane."

It made my eyes water a...

Page 169

...her all night, Miss Mary
Jane said, and they don't think she'll last many hours."

"Only think...

Page 170

...get along the best way they
can; for my niece has been exposed to the dreadful...

Page 171

...couldn't a done it no neater himself.  Of course he
would a throwed more style into...

Page 172

...and I'll
acknowledge, candid and frank, I ain't very well fixed to meet it and
answer it;...

Page 173

...boy again if you was to see him, Hines?"

"I reckon I would, but I don't...

Page 174

...see nobody didn't altogether
believe him.  One man asked me if I see the niggers steal...

Page 175

...side, and chawed his tongue, and scrawled off something;
and then they give the pen to...

Page 176

...thought of something.  Is there anybody here that helped to lay
out my br--helped to lay...

Page 177

...a rail!" and everybody was whooping at once, and there
was a rattling powwow.  But the...

Page 178

...a lantern.  But they sailed into digging anyway by the
flicker of the lightning, and sent...

Page 179

...no more in this
world. She _was_ the best girl I ever see, and had the...

Page 180

...we warn't--_please_ don't, your majesty!"

"Quick, then, and tell us what _was_ your idea, or I'll...

Page 181

...made me squirm!

"Yes," says the duke, kinder slow and deliberate and sarcastic, "_we_
did."

After about a...

Page 182

...I a-trusting you all the time, like you was my own
father.  You ought to been...

Page 183

...till the audience got up and
give them a solid good cussing, and made them skip...

Page 184

...him in the
back room of a little low doggery, very tight, and a lot of...

Page 185

...sell it so cheap.  Maybe there's something
ain't straight about it."

"But it _is_, though--straight as a...

Page 186

...ever done me no harm, and now was
showing me there's One that's always on the...

Page 187

...and set there thinking--thinking
how good it was all this happened so, and how near I...

Page 188

...fairly dark I crept out with my
raft and went for it, and hid it there,...

Page 189

...dog, and so we had to chase him all over the
country till we tired him...

Page 190

...on us--"

He stopped, but I never see the duke look so ugly out of his...

Page 191

...better start in on my plan straight off without fooling
around, because I wanted to stop...

Page 192

...knowed for certain I wished I was dead--for that _is_ the
lonesomest sound in the whole...

Page 193

...she run on:

"Lize, hurry up and get him a hot breakfast right away--or did you...

Page 194

...and not get here too
soon; and so I come down the back way."

"Who'd you give...

Page 195

...it makes me
dreadful uneasy."

"Uneasy!" she says; "I'm ready to go distracted!  He _must_ a come;...

Page 196

...and comfortable till by and by I hear a
steamboat coughing along down the river.  Then...

Page 197

...in your wagon, and let on
it's your'n; and you turn back and fool along slow,...

Page 198

...it was
worth it, too.  There was plenty other farmer-preachers like that, and
done the same way,...

Page 199

...a stranger
from Hicksville, Ohio, and his name was William Thompson--and he made
another bow.

Well, he run...

Page 200

...no; I--I--well, no, I b'lieve I didn't."

Then he looks on around the same way to...

Page 201

...try to work up to it.  But at supper, at night, one of the little
boys...

Page 202

...signal, and
the house rose up and went for them.

So we poked along back home, and...

Page 203

...in there.
Then get up my canoe to-morrow night, and fetch my raft over from the
island....

Page 204

...was going to help steal the nigger?"

"Yes."

"_Well_, then."

That's all he said, and that's all I...

Page 205

...went out, and so did we, and shoved in the staple again, and
the door was...

Page 206

...I just expected it.  I didn't know
nothing to do; and if I had I couldn't...

Page 207

...on to know us.  And if you hear any digging going on
nights, it's us; we're...

Page 208

...a torchlight procession if we wanted to,
I believe.  Now, whilst I think of it, we...

Page 209

...go.  There ain't necessity
enough in this case; and, besides, Jim's a nigger, and wouldn't
understand the...

Page 210

...keep a journal on."

"Journal your granny--_Jim_ can't write."

"S'pose he _can't_ write--he can make marks on...

Page 211

...it, and nobody
don't blame them for it, either.  It ain't no crime in a prisoner...

Page 212

...him the key and done with it.  Picks and shovels--why, they
wouldn't furnish 'em to a...

Page 213

...ain't no trouble; and if it's any object, I don't mind
letting on we was at...

Page 214

...ain't right, and it ain't moral, and I wouldn't like
it to get out; but there...

Page 215

... Come up the stairs, and
let on it's a lightning-rod."

So he done it.

Next day Tom stole...

Page 216

...Aunt
Sally come in to see if he was comfortable and had plenty to eat, and
both...

Page 217

...was in Jim's pan, and we went along with Nat to see how
it would work,...

Page 218

...and you've been good to us and
showed us the runaway nigger.  But you got to...

Page 219

...as that, and I would a sold out
for half price if there was a bidder....

Page 220

...passage, and says:

"Missus, dey's a sheet gone."

"A _sheet_ gone!  Well, for the land's sake!"

"I'll stop...

Page 221

... Tom
see him do it, and remembered about the spoon, and says:

"Well, it ain't no use...

Page 222

..._again_."

So I smouched one, and they come out nine, same as the other time.
 Well, she...

Page 223

...we
couldn't prop it up right, and she would always cave in.  But of course
we thought...

Page 224

...everything all right, and as soon as he was by himself he busted
into the pie...

Page 225

...mean?"

"We ain't got no time to bother over that," he says; "we got to dig...

Page 226

...pens.  It was most pesky
tedious hard work and slow, and didn't give my hands no...

Page 227

...um.  I jis'
's soon have rattlesnakes aroun'."

Tom thought a minute or two, and says:

"It's a...

Page 228

...so much bother and
trouble to be a prisoner."

"Well, it _always_ is when it's done right....

Page 229

... Some other prisoners has done it."

"One er dem big cat-tail-lookin' mullen-stalks would grow in heah,...

Page 230

...out,
and they did; and Aunt Sally she come in, and when we got back she...

Page 231

...them with the tongs.  And if
she turned over and found one in bed she would...

Page 232

...was made, the inscriptions and so on was all carved on the
grindstone; the bed-leg was...

Page 233

...it but fifteen minutes, to carry the
nonnamous letter and shove it under the front door."

"All...

Page 234

...done right.

So he said, now for the grand bulge!  So the very next morning at...

Page 235

...bed, and got up about
half-past eleven, and Tom put on Aunt Sally's dress that he...

Page 236

...their heads, and changing their
seats, and fumbling with their buttons.  I warn't easy myself, but...

Page 237

...get my
words out, I was so anxious; but I told Tom as quick as I...

Page 238

...and the bullets fairly whizzed
around us! We heard them sing out:

"Here they are!  They've broke...

Page 239

... I wish _we'd_ a
had the handling of Louis XVI., there wouldn't a been no 'Son...

Page 240

...and camped on a piece of a raft we found, and about
midnight he must a...

Page 241

...yet.  Well, thinks I, that looks powerful bad
for Tom, and I'll dig out for the...

Page 242

...scrabble all them crazy things onto a grindstone, s'I?
 Here sich 'n' sich a person busted...

Page 243

...of it kivered over with secret African
writ'n done with blood!  Must a ben a raft...

Page 244

...that lonesome room, and I declare to goodness
I was that uneasy 't I crep' up...

Page 245

...bit uneasy; hadn't run across Tom's
track. Aunt Sally was a good _deal_ uneasy; but Uncle...

Page 246

...was asleep.




CHAPTER XLII.

THE old man was uptown again before breakfast, but couldn't get no
track of...

Page 247

...Jim considerble, though, and give him a cuff or two side the
head once in a...

Page 248

...or faithfuller, and yet he was risking his freedom to do it,
and was all tired...

Page 249

...me put in that dratted night paddling
around hunting the runaway nigger.

But I had plenty time....

Page 250

...and the grindstone, and flour, and just no end of things,
and you can't think what...

Page 251

...nigger?  'Deed he hasn't.
 They've got him back, safe and sound, and he's in that cabin...

Page 252

...day, and preached a prayer-meeting
sermon that night that gave him a rattling ruputation, because the
oldest...

Page 253

...no mistake about it.  And I
wrote another one to tell you I was coming; and...

Page 254

...and get an outfit, and go for
howling adventures amongst the Injuns, over in the Territory,...