A Tramp Abroad — Volume 07

By Mark Twain

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...A TRAMP ABROAD, Part 7.

By Mark Twain

(Samuel L. Clemens)

First published in 1880

Illustrations taken from an...

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...323. A TWENTY-FOUR HOUR FIGHT
325. GREAT HEIDELBERG TUN
...

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...music was loud
and strong; we could not see this torrent, for it was dark, now,...

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...it rested against the moon. The unillumined peaks and
minarets, hovering vague and phantom-like above us...

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...states what you are to pay.
The guides serve in rotation; you cannot select the man...

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...away from him at the dropping
of a handkerchief; if France refused to break him, I...

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...His articles in
BLACKWOOD and his lectures on Mont Blanc in London advertised it and
made people...

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...H----y publish my great theory as his own discovery; I even begged
him to do it;...

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...a sullen, distant, continuous
roar in his ears, which is like what he would experience if...

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...and right after it that thump on the floor once more. I
said, "Hang him, he...

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...be able to say I had done
it, and I believed the telescope could set me...

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...us were
so great that at times I was minded to turn back. But I pulled...

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...curving horizon
the eye roved over a troubled sea of sun-kissed Alps, and noted,
here and there,...

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...of his getting advance
payers on the summit and then leaving them there to rot.

A frightful...

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...who seemed entirely inert. Chamonix's
affairs stood still; everybody was in the street, all interest was
centered...

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...food and cordials for the refreshment of their
predecessors; they took lanterns with them, too; night...

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...Mlle. d'Angeville made the ascent --1838. In
Chamonix I picked up a rude old lithograph of...

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...as it were, to the presence of these men during their last hours
of life, and...

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...and ascended to the Hotel
des Pyramides, which is perched on the high moraine which borders...

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...a day, but I would counsel the unpracticed--if not pressed
for time--to allow themselves two. Nothing...

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...admittance--and was refused! A few days
before, the adulations and applauses of a nation were sounding...

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...no matter, ice could not help it; it is incurably flat, incurably
insipid. It is only...

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...in 1,000 of America's population dies, two in 1,000 of the other
populations of the earth...

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...miles wide, and quite level.

We reached the hotel before nine o'clock. Next morning we left...

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...monsieur, they are so beautiful!"

I confessed it, but said they were not suitable for one...

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...error. This was "PURGATORY street." After
a little I said, "NOW I've got the right place,...

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...to claim one little matter of superiority in our
manners; a lady may traverse our streets...

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...boy (also asleep) taking care of
them.



From queer old-fashioned windows along the curve projected boxes of
bright...

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...and abuse an unprotected lady who has
lost the use of her limbs and cannot put...

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...no fire in the parlor, for I think one might as well
have tried to warm...

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...much because they did
not put in anything. I had no Italian money, so I put...

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...was out with the Innocents Abroad,
the ship stopped in the Russian port of Odessa and...

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...heart. Then I
sped away in a guilty hurry, and even when I was a mile...

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...and shipped the clothes to the hotel. He said he
did not keep two suits of...

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...the noble cathedral, where long shafts
of tinted light were cleaving through the solemn dimness from...

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...in the large picture where the Emperor
(Barbarossa?) is prostrate before the Pope, there are three...

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...is beautiful, but only to such as know her; it is a beauty
which cannot be...

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...picture. One year ago
I could not have appreciated it. My study of Art in Heidelberg...

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...one-half feet of turmoil and racket and
insubordination. This latter state of things is not an...

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...by contrast
the impassioned fervor of the hasp. The highlights in this part of the
work are...

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...uneasiness, of distress, without knowing
why. But one is calm before St. Mark's, one is calm...

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...way. In our day it would be immoral to go on
the highway to get bricks...

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...suspicion, and was about to slip a
stiletto into him when Crioni saved himself by explaining...

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...They have it in Europe, but they don't know
how to cook it. Neither will they...

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...such a monotonous
variety of UNSTRIKING dishes. It is an inane dead-level of
"fair-to-middling." There is nothing...

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...the steamer that precedes me, and be hot
when I arrive--as follows:

Radishes....

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... Apple puffs, Southern style.
Peach cobbler, Southern style
...

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...New Orleans sugars,
then solder on the lid and set in a safe place till it...

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...and proceed to that most-visited little gallery
that exists in the world--the Tribune--and there, against the...

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...cipher out the whys and the
wherefores and the consistencies of it--I haven't got time.

Titian's Venus...

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...me out of the country again. I had not enjoyed a pleasure
abroad which seemed to...

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...him who is the best physician in town; or what is the hack
tariff; or how...

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...who will put you in your
railway compartment, buy your tickets, have your baggage weighed, bring
you...

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...and so he gets a
quarter. Your waiter at dinner is another stranger--consequently he gets
a quarter....

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...have seen of him the more I have wished that he might be
adopted in America,...

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...drawing-room rather than for the outside of a house. Many fruit and
flower clusters, human heads...

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...muse over. But that was a hasty idea. Those people had the
advantage of US. They...

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...region round about, and up
and down the river-road, was a dense wilderness of humanity hidden
under...

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...while the whole region about us seemed as bright as day, and yet the
rain was...

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...However, the mere
matter of capacity is a thing of no sort of consequence, since the...

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...Tun now, because they have
got a BIGGER one hid away somewhere. Either that is the...

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...A constable in the service of the
University visits the lodgings of the said student, knocks,...

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...people with my
German. These gentlemen seemed a trifle amused--and a trifle confused,
too--but one of them...

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...captives had
written plaintive verses, or names and dates. I do not think I was ever
in...

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...all by itself,
stood this blood-curdling word:

"Rache!" [1]

1. "Revenge!"

There was no name signed, and no date....

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...and he was actually a student of the old and renowned
university, that he set to...

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...our German during several weeks at that time, and
although we had made good progress, it...

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...of doing something), and this throws the rain into the Dative
case, and makes it DEM...

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...not entirely free from attacks of the
Parenthesis distemper--though they are usually so mild as to...

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...with the forceps, and then stand there and
drawl through a tedious anecdote before they give...

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...hard feeling about it; but with the German
tongue it is different. When a German gets...

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...a good
idea; and a good idea, in this language, is necessarily conspicuous from
its lonesomeness. I...

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...and if he ends by trying to comfort
himself with the thought that he can at...

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...cry
for Help; but if any Sound comes out of him, alas he is drowned by...

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...suspected,
or married; until I look in the dictionary, and then I find it means the
latter....

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...equivalent of the English
phrase "You know," and does not mean anything at all--in TALK, though
it...

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...increase the
variety of my stock. Here are some specimens which I lately bought at an
auction...

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...a case of really unjustifiable
compounding; because it not only saves no time or trouble, but...

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...blow, thunder, explosion; howl, cry, shout, yell,
groan; battle, hell. These are magnificent words; the have...

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...those also which deal with
the creatures and marvels of fairyland; and lastly and chiefly, in
those...

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...import some strong words from the English tongue--to
swear with, and also to use in describing...

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...application shall result in my being formally employed by the
government in the work of reforming...

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...in Bruderliche concord, ist zwar a welcome and
inspiriting spectacle. And what has moved you to...

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...said the two strings of his heart were rooted, the one in his
daughter, the other...

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...the learned tongues!--they can scarce read their own."

But Hildegarde's faith was in no wise shaken....

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...this time,
in spite of him. Nothing else would have prevented his rushing off to
rescue the...

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...tickled the audience and a score of voices shouted,
"Go it, Green-patch!"

"Going--going--going--third and last call--one--two--"

"Seven hundred!"

"Huzzah!--well...

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...other dog-fights, horse-races,
walking-machines, yachting-contents, rifle-matches, or other sporting
matters of any sort; no reports of banquet...

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...name of the town, is placed
a letter or a sign, to indicate who the correspondent...

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...in my copy of the Munich
journal consists of a total of 1,654 words --for I...

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...concert in Frankfurt-on-the-Main, with an orchestra
of one hundred and eight instruments, seven and one-half lines....

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...complete
skeleton. The stomach and intestines were utterly empty; they contained
nothing whatsoever. The flesh on the...