A Tramp Abroad — Volume 06

By Mark Twain

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...A TRAMP ABROAD, Part 6.

By Mark Twain

(Samuel L. Clemens)

First published in 1880

Illustrations taken from an...

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... 274. STORAGE OF ANCESTORS
275. ...

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...bell is a good deal the worst
one that has been contrived yet, and is peculiarly...

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...with a shotgun and hit a worse reader than himself, unless
the weapon scattered shamefully. I...

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..."They don't have those lop-eared dogs
in a Protestant canton." Then it was with the roads:...

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...not make anything by contradicting a man who would probably put me
down at once with...

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...would have fallen like a windfall to me: fishing the child
out--witnessing the surprise of the...

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...is what the Matterhorn is--a monument. Its office, henceforth, for
all time, will be to keep...

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...itself.

We were not dreaming; this was not a make-believe home of the
Alp-climber, created by our...

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...with our getting up an
adventure whenever we should choose the time and the object. I...

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...curved around and ended at a precipice eight
hundred feet high, overlooking a glacier. His foot...

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...Alp-climber; the more fun he
has, the more he wants.



CHAPTER XXXVII

[Our Imposing Column Starts Upward]


After I...

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...not easy to eat calmly
when you are a lion; but it is very pleasant, nevertheless.

As...

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...At that hour it began to move. In point of numbers and
spectacular effect, it was...

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...over a detachment to see
if it was safe, the caravan crossed without accident. The way...

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...a cottage. This barrier took
all the remaining spirit out of the men, and a panic...

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...light we roped ourselves together and went at that rock. For some
time we tried the...

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...in the cellar, and upon them I laid six of my forty-foot
ladders, side by side,...

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...anxiety?

This thought gave us a shock. I was in the very first act of detailing
an...

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...suggested an idea
to me. I ordered the caravan to 'bout face and form in marching...

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...glad shouts to obey. We had followed this ram round
and round in a circle all...

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...and that it
was only the summit that was lost and not themselves, they cheered up
instantly...

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...the extraordinary altitude of two hundred thousand feet above
sea-level. Science places the line of eternal...

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...by some unaccountable oversight had come away rather
short-handed in the matter of barkeepers.

On the following...

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...Visp, as it makes its
first plunge into the world from under a huge arch of...

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...bygone joys that may
be tasted in their freshness but once.) Ah, I know what it...

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...all the time. I am under promise to go to
Italy, where I am to be...

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...other, bent his body in the middle three times, murmuring:

"Pleasure, 'm sure; great pleasure, 'm...

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...stood at last upon the summit, and without the loss of a
single man except the...

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...from that high place. All the circling horizon was
piled high with a mighty tumult of...

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...Possibly mass and distance add something--at any rate,
something IS added. Among other noticeable things, there...

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...willing to
expose the brave fellows to the perils, fatigues, and hardships of that
fearful route again...

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...him extreme credit, but that he must not throw
away the imperishable distinction of being the...

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...carry it out. Yes, I actually had to give that
thing up--while doubtless I should live...

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...it up, every day, and consequently it
had melted its way deeper and deeper into the...

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..."That's the difference between
governments and individuals. Governments don't care, individuals do. Tom
Scott would take all...

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...the menagerie.

We arrived that evening, after many hardships and adventures, in some
fields close to the...

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...have disappeared in them have been sought
for, in the hope that they had stopped within...

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...as the modern glaciers are, they are not so huge as were some
that once existed....

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...the glaciers (either on
account of the interior heat of the earth, or from other causes),...

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...so many years. There is record of
a striking and curious example of the accuracy which...

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...with fine white teeth. A forearm and hand, all
the fingers of the latter intact. The...

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...A man who has not seen a friend
for a generation, keeps him in mind always...

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...in the
British Museum, who said:

"I overheard your name. Are you from Chamonix, Monsieur Balmat?"

"Yes, sir."

"Haven't...

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...one tourist and one native walked together. The youngest
Taugwalder fell to my share. The wine-bags...

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...for about sixty feet, then doubled
back to the ridge which descends toward Zermatt. A long...

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...own sake, and I am not
sure that it ever occurred to me again. For some...

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...able to do that which should have been done at first, and fixed
rope to firm...

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...man dies and leaves his house to his
son--and at the same time, this dead father...

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...plow-handles to moisten his hands, in
the usual way; he lost his balance and fell out...

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...with a most blood-curdling amount
of care and caution. The "guide" at the head of the...

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...he glanced around and discovered Jimmy standing in an
imposing attitude in a corner, with a...

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...of
the "prisoner of Chillon," whose story Byron had told in such moving
verse; so I took...

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...before we reached the village of Argentiere a vast
dome of snow with the sun blazing...

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..."be not
disturbed by that--remain tranquil--give yourselves no uneasiness--their
dust rises far before us--rest you tranquil, leave...