A Tramp Abroad — Volume 05

By Mark Twain

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...A TRAMP ABROAD, Part 5.

By Mark Twain

(Samuel L. Clemens)

First published in 1880

Illustrations taken from an...

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... WHAT MIGHT BE
216. AN ALPINE BOUQUET
...

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...heard his horn and instantly got up. It was dark
and cold and wretched. As I...

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...And all through your blundering. It was exactly
like you to light a pipe and sit...

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...miniature world had exactly the appearance of those "relief
maps" which reproduce nature precisely, with the...

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...upon that far-off
valley which I was describing a while ago.

There was no level ground at...

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...safe.

So ends the eventual trip which we made to the Rigi-Kulm to see an
Alpine sunrise.



CHAPTER...

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...summit of the Furka; and exactly in
front of us, at a HOPOW of only fifteen...

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...lake.



The next afternoon we started for a walk up the Unteraar glacier, with
the intention of,...

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...and
furnished with outside shutters, the two men who stay here when the
VOYAGEURS are snugly quartered...

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...excursion to the glacier.
This was more beautiful than words can describe, for in the constant
progress...

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...so startling
that I felt no inclination to move toward bed again. The snow which
had collected...

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...It's Choctaw."

"What is 'SCHNAWP'?"

"'Valley.' That is Choctaw, also."

"What is 'BOLWOGGOLY'?"

"That is Chinese for 'hill.'"

"'KAHKAHPONEEKA'?"

"'Ascent.' Choctaw."

"'But...

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...a nobler language--English; yet they think they
'adorn their page' when they say STRASSE for street,...

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...against the fresh green of the
hillside, and it looks ever so cozy and inviting and...

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...an indifferent likeness.
During his hermit life, according to legend, he partook of the bread
and wine...

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...Meiringen, and the
rushing blue-gray river Aar, and the broad level green valley; and
across at the...

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...the
other horse, opposite to the first one, after crossing them and bringing
the loose end back,...

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...flying and the horn tooting.



When we reached the base of the Kaiserstuhl, we took two...

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...of times, and added new and killing varieties to it. When the
bride finally recovered, she...

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...if a body could get hold
of a little fruit and milk here and there, in...

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...bowed head, was
sleeping on the box, two dozen barefooted and bareheaded children were
gathered about the...

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...a woman of forty, had side-whiskers reaching
half-way down her jaws. They were two fingers broad,...

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..."cries of the wounded," they struck their colors
and retired in a kind of panic.



There never...

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...might call a sketch. Other artists have done me the grace to
admire it; but I...

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...remark. I said:

"What makes you think I have a courier?"

"Ah, that is very simple; he...

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...number of them. This was the first time I had ever used the
courier at the...

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...a condition to kill somebody by this time. Meantime, you have
been sitting in your car,...

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...also had
dealings with one who might fairly be called perfection. He was a young
Polander, named...

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...unchangeable,
after all life should be gone and the earth have become a vacant
desolation.

While I was...

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...a couple between meals, five at luncheon, three in the
afternoon, seven at dinner, four for...

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...we went to bed, after laying out the walking-costumes and
putting them into condition for instant...

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...sociably into the
rear of the forward carriage, and as we toiled up the long hills...

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...relations with
the high altitudes before; the snow-peaks had always been remote and
unapproachable grandeurs, hitherto, but...

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...that little hotel, backed up against a
precipice that had no visible top to it, but...

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...be
about the same, and it is pleasanter to slide than to bounce. I could
not see...

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...be noble enough, but it is not
attractive, and it is not white. The fuzzy blossom...

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...were of an age to learn to do in Rome as Rome does, without much
effort.

At...

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...spirit, the only smiling
thing, in all that grisly desert. She seemed to say, "Cheer up!--as...

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...the dark vault
of heaven, and their gentle light shed a fairylike gleam over the
snow-fields around...

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...that if one of them slipped on those
giddy heights, the others could brace themselves on...

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...to the summit of our ambition. These were in one or two
places so narrow, that...

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...wee pedestal of the very
summit, in a driving wind, and looked out upon the vast...

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...a glacier before.

Here we came upon a new board shanty, and found some men engaged...

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...or
banks on the other. When he goes into the passenger business he absurdly
clings to his...

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...He went swinging
along valleyward again, as if he did not know he had just swindled...

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...out over the
precipice; and her face began to bend downward a little, and she put
up...

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...resolved to wait over a
day at Leuk and come back and get him.

Then we sat...

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...they made a specialty of it. I was indifferent, for the
chamois is a creature that...

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...outlying flange of her foot, and hearing,
from up toward the ceiling, a deep "Pardon, m'sieu,...

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...bare and stupendous precipices rising
into the clouds before us. I had never seen a clean,...

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...have
repeated it for the wealth of the world. I shall break my neck yet with
some...

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...Darwin would call "rudimentary"
sleeves; these had "edging" around them, but the bosom was ridiculously
plain. The...