A Tramp Abroad — Volume 04

By Mark Twain

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...A TRAMP ABROAD, Part 4.

By Mark Twain

(Samuel L. Clemens)

First published in 1880

Illustrations taken from an...

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...DOCTOR RECOMMENDED
157. WANTED TO FEEL SAFE
...

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...One cannot describe those noble woods,
nor the feeling with which they inspire him. A feature...

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...roof was of ancient mud-colored straw thatch a foot thick,
and was covered all over, except...

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...Hans Schmidt,
young neighbor, full of sentiment, full of poetry, loves Gretchen,
Gretchen loves him. But he...

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...in a very
pretty village (Ottenhoefen), and then went into the public room to rest
and smoke....

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...from all over Germany--but we
had the old road to ourselves.

Now and then, while we rested,...

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...from
Heidelberg to Paris by way of Strasburg steeple; when he gets up there
he finds that...

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...in a
different direction to see if he can't find an old nail or something
else that...

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...never gets home with anything he starts with. This disposes of the
last remnant of his...

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...and said:

"Baked, they were tough; and even boiled, they warn't things for a
hungry man to...

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...of it while he
lived. That is to say, if a man gets the habit of...

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...process the conversation
melted out of one of these subjects and into the next, until the...

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...think 't if a feller he'ps another feller when
he's in trouble, and don't cuss, and...

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...the subject of skeletons that
brought this boy back to my recollection. Before a very long...

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...fastidiously
accurate--is, that it is a little steeper than a ladder and not quite
so steep as...

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...of dust. Every seat was
crowded, too; for it was Sunday, and consequently everybody was taking
a...

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...to get around the fact that if it is wrong for
the printer to work at...

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...pets
of fortune laugh at this poor soul, you will deserve to be flayed for
it." Things...

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...noble of the Middle Ages got lost in the mountains,
and wandered about with his dogs...

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...kinds of music--one kind which one feels, just
as an oyster might, and another sort which...

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...Baden-Baden this time, was to join our courier.
I had thought it best to hire one,...

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...gun. It is much easier to
catch it than it is to shoot it, and only...

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...or lean on the railing and watch the schools
of fishes darting about in the clear...

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...than people, for the multitude sat
at immensely long tables, and therefore the faces were mainly...

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...of this room without recognizing me.
Sit down, sit down--how odd it is--you are the last...

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...some other kind of animal--possibly a dog, maybe an elephant.
However, tails are common to all...

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...She was still ruminating over that last child's title, but
presently she said:

"I have always been...

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...child named Thomas Henry."

"That makes it more singular than ever," murmured my beautiful friend.

"Does it?...

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...don't doubt it. Upon my word I don't. I think you were capable of it.
It...

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...to inquire
into her politics?"

"No, I thought of that. She is a democrat, her husband is...

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...think there's a pair of us, after all. Now what do you think
of yourself?"

"Well, I...

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...face of a low cliff--for
he is carved from the living rock of the cliff. His...

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...His comprehension was
always a train or two behindhand. If a national toe required amputating,
he could...

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...ones, or even any photographic
slanders of him. The truth is, these copies were so common,...

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...pictures, by old
Swiss masters--old boss sign-painters, who flourished before the
decadence of art.

The lake is alive...

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...the
delegation, and get the appointment, haven't I?"

"Yes ... very true ... that is correct. And...

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...four, to go over the rough mountain
roads with where a body had to be careful...

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...So tomorrow I'll be up bright and early, make my
little old collection, and mosey off...

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...to enjoy it. One may see the fisher-loafers just as
thick and contented and happy and...

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...steamer
with their prodigious bulk in the most impressive way. Not snow-clad
mountains, these, yet they climbed...

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...with the
fashion; red-striped stockings, very low-quarter patent-leather shoes,
tied with black ribbon; blue ribbon around his...

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...know. Is there more than one?"

"Three. You stop at the Schreiber--you'll find it full of...

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...my alpenstock, but as I raised the weapon
the disposition left me; I found I hadn't...

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...it
rougher. Where are you from?"

"New Jersey."

"So'm I. No--I didn't mean that; I'm from New England....

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...you going to stop at?"

"I don't know."

"Well, then you stop at the Schreiber--it's full of...

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...on foot, as one may prefer. I and my agent panoplied
ourselves in walking-costume, one bright...

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...the trail, and
soon disappeared. By six o'clock we were pretty high up in the air,
and...

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...boy to a dot.

We got under way about the turn of noon, and pulled out...

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...the first
time the famous Alpine JODEL in its own native wilds. And we recognized,
also, that...

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...hurried off to bed. It was unspeakably
comfortable to stretch our weary limbs between the cool,...

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...loss of time.

We climbed and climbed; and we kept on climbing; we reached about forty
summits,...

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...the windows and chimneys, and a dull blur of
lights. Our first emotion was deep, unutterable...

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...again when I get time, for
my letters may have miscarried.

We curled up in the clammy...

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...in the way of an ass."

"What have I done?" I answered, with heat.

"What have you...