A Tramp Abroad — Volume 03

By Mark Twain

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...A TRAMP ABROAD, Part 3.

By Mark Twain

(Samuel L. Clemens)

First published in 1880

Illustrations taken from an...

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... 112. TAIL PIECE
113. A COMPREHENSIVE YAWN
...

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...wheelbarrows, they drag the cart when there is no dog or
lean cow to drag it--and...

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...the vessel. It proved to be a steamboat--for they
had begun to run a steamer up...

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...and thirty mules can do it in two, it is believed
that the old-fashioned towing industry...

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...or his culverin, or some such place, and
resolved that she should stay there until she...

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...received him as his son, and wanted him to stay by him
and be the comfort...

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...is rich in folk-songs, and the words and airs of several of them
are peculiarly beautiful--but...

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...went dreaming about, thinking
only of his fairy and caring for naught else in the world....

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...in
her left hand she called the waves to her service. They began to mount
heavenward; the...

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...summits are drinking
The sunset's flooding wine;


...

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...comb so lustrous,
And thereby a song sings,
...

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...sitting. Behind her a fertile valley
perfused by a river."

"A beautiful bouquet animated by May-bugs, etc."

"A...

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...succor, and fled
to the mountains for refuge.

At last Sir Wissenschaft, a poor and obscure knight,...

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...request," at the same time beckoning out behind
with his heel for a detachment of his...

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...hours we had been making three and a half or four miles an hour
and we...

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...trim and snug and pretty as they could be. They
were always of brick or stone;...

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...the men know, or there
will be a panic and mutiny! Lay her in shore and...

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...pretty chambers upstairs that
had clean, comfortable beds in them with heirloom pillowcases most
elaborately and tastefully...

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...of chickens and doves
begged for crumbs, and a poor old tailless raven hopped about with
a...

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...boat to hire. I suppose I must have spoken High German--Court
German--I intended it for that,...

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...such confidence--perhaps
that helped. And possibly the raftsmen's dialect was what is called
PLATT-DEUTSCH, and so they...

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...not belong to the corps.

I finally went to headquarters--to the White Caps--where I would
have gone...

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...they might be American, they might be English, it was not safe
to venture a bow;...

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...upstairs we were halted
by an official--something about Miss Jones's dress was not according to
rule; I...

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...you and show you.

In London, too, many a time, strangers have walked several blocks with
me...

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...the look of a king's crown than a cap. That
lofty green eminence and its quaint...

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...them along the lane and keeping them out of the
dwellings; a cooper was at work...

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...a
subterranean passage branched from it and descended gradually to a
remote place in the valley, where...

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...Conrad von Geisberg heard this, he said that if the
castle were his he would destroy...

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...a lord Ulrich among the guests?"

"I know none of the name, so please your honor."

Conrad...

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...jest, and bravely carried out. They gave you a heavy
sleeping-draught before you went to bed,...

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...vigorous with its four hundred
years, I feel a desire to believe the legend for ITS...

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...had arrived from Hamburg
at last. Let this be a warning to the reader. The Germans...

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...fine and rare; the shape is
exceedingly beautiful and unusual. It has wonderful decorations on it,
but...

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...in what they call his
"tuppenny collection of beggarly trivialities"; and for beginning his
book with a...

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...a good satisfying interchange, for I leave here
early in the morning." We agreed to that,...

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...occur.

"Yes indeedy! If _I_ ain't an American there AIN'T any Americans, that's
all. And when I...

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...HEARTY. But I'm awful homesick.
I'm homesick from ear-socket to crupper, and from crupper to hock-joint;
but...

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...these people are there for a real purpose,
however; they are racked with rheumatism, and they...

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...you look blandly into each other's
eyes, and hold the following idiotic conversation:

"How much?"

"NACH BELIEBE."

"How much?"

"NACH...

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...he replied with
the question, 'Do you think you are obliged to buy it?' However, these
people...

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...that limpid bath. You remain in it ten minutes, the first time,
and afterward increase the...

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...saying that the facts in
the above item, about the army and the Indians, are made...

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...handwork, and the walls and ceilings frescoed with historical
and mythological scenes in glaring colors. There...

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...had lost one eye.



In this sordid place, and clothed, bedded, and fed like a pauper,...