A Tramp Abroad

By Mark Twain

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...A TRAMP ABROAD BY MARK TWAIN

By Mark Twain

(Samuel L. Clemens)

First published in 1880

Illustrations taken from...

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...VALLEY BEFORE AND AFTER THE LANDSLIDE

193.  THE WAY THEY DO IT

194.  OUR GALLANT DRIVER

195.  A MOUNTAIN PASS

196.  "I'M OFUL...

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...Immense Audience--Industrious
Students--Politeness of the Students--Intercourse with the Professors
Scenes at the Castle Garden--Abundance of Dogs--Symbol of...

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...Knapsack--The Knight Pitied and Advised--He Attacks
the Monster--Victory for the Fire Extinguisher--The Knight rewarded--His
Strange Request----Spectacles Made...

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...of Harris's Report

CHAPTER XXXI Preparations for a Tramp--From Lucerne to Interlaken--The
Brunig Pass--Modern and Ancient Chalets--Death...

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...Guild
of Guides--The Guide--in--Chief--The Returned Tourist--Getting
Diploma--Rigid Rules--Unsuccessful Efforts to Procure a Diploma--The
Record-Book--The Conqueror of Mont Blanc--Professional...

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...in the soft spring weather, but at the
last moment we changed the program, for private...

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...uniforms of the soldiers, they were newness
and brightness carried to perfection. One could never detect...

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...envied him the high favor; how increased curiosity, who the masked
knight could be.

"Also the Emperor...

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...is not the
_Porter_, but is a sort of first-mate of a hotel) [1. See Appendix
A]...

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...one of them skipped irreverently over the carpet and
took up a position on the other...

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...The building seems very
airily situated. It has the appearance of being on a shelf half-way
up...

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...mass of the Castle, the
town lay, stretched along the river, its intricate cobweb of streets
jeweled...

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...tune with the place, and in the right mood to enjoy the
supernatural, a raven suddenly...

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...raven shouts after you,
"What a hat!" "Oh, pull down your vest!" and that sort of...

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...Well, so he is, in a measure--but he's got
feathers on him, and don't belong to...

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...on the thing he had struck. It was a knot-hole in the roof.
He cocked his...

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...it's a totally new kind of a hole.' Then he begun
to get mad. He held...

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...and looked again. He
couldn't seem to make it out, so he raised a yell, and...

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...and so is living, too. The
Anglo-American Club, composed of British and American students, had
twenty-five members,...

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...for these studies; but
he can skip attendance.

The result of this system is, that lecture-courses upon...

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...and the wooded
hills, they drove in cabs, they boated on the river, they sipped beer
and...

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...else had them, too--old men and young ones, old women and
nice young ladies. If there...

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...a hundred yards and arrived at a two-story public
house; we were acquainted with its outside...

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...friends of his who also wore white caps,
and while we stood conversing, two strange-looking figures...

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...midst of the sword-flashes, I saw a handful of hair
skip into the air as if...

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...he had mentioned that he was to
fight next--and had also pointed out his challenger, a...

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...a conscious paling of my face when I
occasionally saw a wound of a yet more...

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...did begin, too, and with a most impetuous energy,
without waiting for anybody to give the...

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...be endangered. Fatal accidents are
possible, however. For instance, the student's sword may break, and the
end...

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...a student of another corps; he is free to
decline--everybody says so--there is no compulsion. This...

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...such accent the milder ones, which form
a city map on a man's face; they suggest...

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...am writing of, only eighty belonged to the
five corps, and it is only these corps...

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...in the parks, on the street,
and anywhere and everywhere that the students go, caps of...

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...we had gone thither the following week as guests of another corps,
the white caps, without...

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...the brave fellow steeped in a profound French calm.
I say French calm, because French calmness...

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...well, and would leave that and the other details of the
proposed meeting to me. Therefore...

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...to be
pistols. They were single-barreled and silver-mounted, and very dainty
and pretty. I was not able...

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...world shall see how the chivalry of France
meets death."

After a long silence he asked:

"Was nothing...

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...swell duel as
this before. I have had a good deal to do with duels on...

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...France might live."

Arrived on the field, my fellow-second and I paced off the thirty-five
yards, and...

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...be standing, and cautioned him to
listen well and further guide himself by my fellow-second's whoop.
Then...

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...that distinction.

Such is the true version of the most memorable private conflict of the
age.

I have...

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...I had been alone. Those strangers would
not have been surprised to see a man do...

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...indictive narrative in turn, accompanied by the whole orchestra of
sixty instruments, and when this had...

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...elder party--for the young girl only listened,
and gave assenting nods, but never said a word....

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...came from a distance always ran the risk
and took the chances, preferring the loss of...

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...it is already many
years that he has lost his voice, but in other times he...

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...he has been able to sing
twenty-five years ago?" [Then pensively.] "_Ach_, no, _now_ he not...

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...house ceased--nobody was standing, or
walking up the aisles, or fumbling with a seat, the stream...

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...once, and which--but I
will tell the incident:

One evening on board a Mississippi steamboat, a boy...

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...the King would arrive, solitary and alone, and the players
would begin at the beginning and...

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...him with a repetition to gratify their own vanity.

During the remainder of the act the...

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...any other
work in the Exhibition. But the most gratifying thing of all was, that
chance strangers,...

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...that we
had done wisely, because it would be just as enjoyable to walk _down_
the Neckar...

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...points of view; the spectator is to observe the man
from bout where that flag is,...

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...death when you ought to
be enjoying your travels. The windows looked out on a little...

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...as he had soundly
trounced the authors of them. He was prompt to take up any...

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...we found
it was beautifully situated, but on top of a mound, or hill, round and
tolerably...

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...of
wine he had asked for. The head waiter picked up the bottle, cast his
undertaker-eye on...

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...inches deep in the stone flags; it had taken many
generations of swinging children to accomplish...

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...was that?

My dulled faculties dragged themselves partly back to life and took a
receptive attitude. Now...

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...until I found he was not angry; then I was sorry. He soon
went to sleep...

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...more noise than it would
have done in the daytime. In those cases I always stopped...

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...I do believe I should have
said something then which could not be put into a...

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...in his long
night-garment, with a candle, young Z after him with another candle; a
procession swept...

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...think it is a haystack or a
woman. This study was exhibited in the Paris Salon...

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...of adventure came suddenly upon me, and I said to my
comrades:

"I am going to Heidelberg...

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...and vexations and sorrows that
harass the mind vanish away, and existence becomes a dream, a...

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...in the towns it is different, there she only does
certain things, the men do the...

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...for
apparently she had no propeller or paddles. She came churning along,
now, making a deal of...

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...some
chickens cooked, while the raft waited; then we immediately put to sea
again, and had our...

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...the Holy Land.
Finally, she resolved that she would endure the attentions of the rich
lovers no...

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...was broken, he would give the remnant of his life to high deeds in
the cause...

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...not possible that it is much known in America, else I should have
heard it there....

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...the
youth to betake himself to the camp. Obedience was promised. Garnham
says:

"It was on the evening...

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...enchanting tones have often been
heard. In the beautiful, refreshing, still nights of spring, when the
moon...

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...he gets to the end of a bar. Still,
Garnham's translation has high merits, and I...

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...thought to be
Bindi Altoviti's portrait; now somebody will again have it to be the
self-portrait of...

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...might ask for; for he had a surplusage of daughters, and it was
customary for dragon-killers...

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...and
patiently studied them and experimented upon them while they grew. Thus
he had found out that...

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...us, but what could _we_ do?
You can't back a raft upstream, you can't hurry it...

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...done mainly by Italians. That was a revelation. We have
the notion in our country that...

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...the roaring of the wind through the shingle-bundles. By
this time the sea was running inches...

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...like being turned out of his warm bed to
open his house for us. But no...

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...great cages populous
with fluttering and chattering foreign birds, and other great cages and
greater wire pens,...

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...leering,
unkempt and uncombed idiots, who held out hands or caps and begged
piteously. The people of...

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...sentence
wrong end first and upside down, according to German construction, and
sprinkle in a German word...

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...matter where he was born.

8. No student can belong to it who is not of...

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...for me, but not for
Harris. Three courses of a table d'hôte dinner were enough for...

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...good-by and wished us a pleasant journey. Perhaps they were more
generous with us than they...

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...things go
in this way."

If one asks a German a civil question, he will be quite...

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...no, the village wall is itself the rear wall of the first
circle of buildings, and...

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...crooked lane which had been paved in the Middle
Ages. A strapping, ruddy girl was beating...

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...four hundred feet deep, and furnished all the
village with an abundant supply of water, in...

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...LEGEND OF DILSBERG CASTLE

It was to this effect. In the old times there was once...

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...and along it to
the great hall. Here he was met by a middle-aged stranger of...

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...flung about Conrad's
neck and a sweet voice cried:

"There, Conrad mine, thy kind words kill me--the...

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...his poor Catharina." Then
Catharina sat under the linden alone, every day and all day long,...

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...wet and felt
ridiculous and did not care anything for descriptions of scenery. The
young ladies, and...

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...used to keep
tears or something in these things, and that it was very hard to...

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...as making doll-clothes, or decorating Japanese pots
with decalcomania butterflies would be, and these people fling...

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...been
in Europe some time, but were not at all expecting to run across him.
Both parties...

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...waif who has been longing for a friend,
and a sympathetic ear, and a chance to...

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...hanker after them when I can get pie--but I
_read_ them, anyway, because whatever the old...

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...public promenade before the Conversation
House, and in the afternoon and evening that locality is populous...

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...are getting angry, but you are trying not to show it; you resolve
to keep on...

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...always wanting. I know of an
instance where a shopkeeper tossed a coin back to an...

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...This tub
is full of water which is as clear as crystal, and is tempered to...

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...1,200 soldiers against them, is utilized here to discourage
emigration to America. The common people think...

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...walls of one room were pretty completely covered
with small pictures of the Margravine in all...

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...this wrinkled, smoldering old fire-eater occupying
the other side, mumbling her prayers and munching her sausages...

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...mansion of a rich farmer and member of the Common
Council of the parish or district....

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...has not been properly magnified in the
Black Forest stories. Manure is evidently the Black-Forester's main
treasure--his...

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...forsook the world, I
wandered in the solitude of the forest, longing for death but finding
none....

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...that particular afternoon, and with no comfort but what we
could get out of the fact...

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...the opposite direction;
not calmly and wisely, but with a frantic haste which is wasteful of...

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...of being an obstructionist. They lock
themselves together and chew each other's jaws for a while;...

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...anybody to
watch them, and go off to indulge in some other idiotic miracle for
vanity's sake.

Science...

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...had as fine an instinct seven
hundred years ago in ferreting out the choicest nooks and...

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...to eye and
soul and sense; but the supreme pleasure comes from the talk. It is...

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...daily dental hour there would always be about five
hundred soldiers gathered together in the neighborhood...

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...don't reckon, but up as fur as
twelve-times-twelve I ain't no slouch. 'Tother side of that...

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...and eyelashes. He simply said:

"I consider them kind of seeg'yars dangersome,"--and seemed to suspect
nothing. The...

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...He had sold the skeleton to a traveling quack for three
dollars and was enjoying the...

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...there we ate bread and cheese, and drank milk and
beer with everybody, and had a...

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...to lie quiet in the
house on Sunday; if the hand, the arm, the brain, the...

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...do anybody's heart good to worship in.

I thought it was pretty manifest that the elderly...

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...all the time.

This is the only time I have ever had an Empress under my...

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...uplifted me, enraptured me, that I was full of
cry all the time, and mad with...

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...for it. A Boston
newspaper reporter went and took a look at the Slave Ship floundering
about...

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...inside your clothes;
thus it is not shy, but extremely sociable; it is not afraid of...

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...in a crowded, disorderly, but picturesque way, offering
to the eye a heaped-up confusion of red...

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...but a bonanza
could not purchase it after his great deeds have been inscribed upon it.
There...

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...walks. I will go and speak to this young girl."

The thing I had in my...

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...did not believe she was half as much to blame
as her father was, and I...

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...getting pretty thin, here. I would
have given something to know what the child's was. However,...

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...to make my
good-bys and get out, when the girl said:

"But there is one thing that...

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...look as young as you did then, you are just as beautiful as you were
then,...

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...curiosity has got away from his keeper--let us amuse
ourselves with him.' There is no other...

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...the interview, when I said you and I would tour
around with them with pleasure, and...

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...speak. Then right away the organist would let go another
avalanche.

The commerce of Lucerne consists mainly...

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...out of him. He knew, well enough, that in national
emergencies he must not consider how...

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...all of her saintship yet. Martyrdom made a saint
of the trivial and foolish Marie Antoinette,...

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...I would do that man an ill turn.

What I meant, was, that I would break...

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...and all
the teachers, and by more than two hundred other people. Now I want you,
if...

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...said,
'Never mind,' and jumped out and told the coachman to wait--said
he hadn't time to take...

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...over those mountain roads on wheels in
the dead of winter, not if he knew himself.

"On...

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...in
_too_ much of a hurry to rush off to San Francisco with that post-office
appointment, Mr....

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...like them nearer than
the distant Rhone Glacier.

For some days we were content to enjoy looking...

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...distant and dominating
Jungfrau, or some kindred giant, looming head and shoulders above a
tumbled waste of...

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...as I see him--and so I speak to him and make his acquaintance. I
like to...

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...kind of a person, ain't
you?"

"I prefer it to any other dissipation."

"That's my notion, too. Now...

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...imprisonment at hard labor;
you will then be horsewhipped, tarred and feathered, deprived of your
ears, ridden...

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...three days. It's awful
undermining to the intellect, German is; you want to take it in...

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...by this time. But that ain't any
matter, of course they'll stuff it. Did you say...

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...to stretch
out on the grass in the shade and take a bit of a smoke...

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...in the morning and ran to the
window it was already too late, because it was...

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...trace them up and find
them--were so reduced, almost invisible, and lay so flat against the
ground,...

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...latter part of the afternoon we cooled our roasting interiors
with ice-cold water from clear streams,...

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...ill luck, that we had
missed those other sunrises.

We were informed by the guide-book that we...

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...the next instant
was smothered in the fog again. It was really the hotel we were...

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...to buy a paper-cutter, but I believed
I could remember the cold comfort of the Rigi-Kulm...

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...soft and rich and sensuous paradise.

We could not speak. We could hardly breathe. We could...

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...by the gloom of a couple sickly
candles, but we could hardly button anything, our hands...

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...your most valuable faculty would be wasted
on you. But don't stop to quarrel, now--maybe we...

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...by rail in about an hour, so I chose the latter method.
I wanted to see...

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...spot it just stopped--that was all there was "to
it"--stopped on the steep incline, and when...

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...foot must take care of himself.

Thinking over my plans, as mapped out, I perceived that...

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...other prominent feature in the Oberland is visible from this
_bong-a-bong_; nothing withdraws the attention from...

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...and had walked
nearly three hours from the Grimsel, when, just as we were thinking of
crossing...

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...the _regen_ thickened unpleasantly, and we attempted to get
shelter under a projecting rock, but being...

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...our eyes upon one of the loveliest
objects in creation. The glacier was all around divided...

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...sky was cloudless overhead, though small curling mists lay
thousands of feet below us in the...

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...they mean just what the English ones do."

"Then why do you use them? Why have...

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...have as much right, I suppose, to
'adorn your page' with Zulu and Chinese and Choctaw...

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...hideous, straight-up-and-down
thing, plastered all over on the outside to look like stone, and
altogether so stiff,...

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...the time. One does not understand why rocks
and landslides do not plunge down these declivities...

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...at the superb
Oltschiback and the other beautiful cascades that leap from those rugged
heights, robed in...

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...puts the iron thing
in his mouth for him to grit his teeth on, uphill, and...

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...rush and clatter. He could not have six horses all the time,
so he made the...

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...made her laugh again, Neddy ordered the
champagne.

The fact that this young woman had never moistened...

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...Indeed it was a wonderful road. It was
smooth, and compact, and clean, and the side...

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...of
sluggish interest in us.

We had slept an hour and a half and missed all the...

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...about the
front porches and the ornamental grounds belonging to the hotel, to
enjoy the cool air;...

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...its
way; it was the worst music that had ever been achieved on our planet by
a...

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...course. It is only two or three thousand feet high, and of
course has no snow...

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...a
percentage."

"Undoubtedly. The courier always has his percentage. In this case it
would have been a hundred...

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...value
cannot be estimated in dollars and cents. Without him, travel is a
bitter harassment, a purgatory...

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...with the guard. At way-stations the courier comes to
your compartment to see if you want...

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...everything
in his line, but he knew the best ways and the quickest; he was handy
with...

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...feel it again--a longing which is like
homesickness; a grieving, haunting yearning which will plead, implore,
and...

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...second all the day long, and his regular barrel per day.

He said that men cured...

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...beautiful lake of Thun, with a dim and dreamlike picture of
watery expanses and spectral Alpine...

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...in my memory yet the picture of that forward
driver, on his knees on his high...

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...the precipices, sank down into the rock and
sprang in big jets out of holes in...

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...hired the only guide left, to lead us on our way. He was over
seventy, but...

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...and by, while standing before a
group of these giants, we looked around for the chalet...

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...of those upper altitudes, however, for they are sometimes
intruded upon by some of the loveliest...

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...shanties.
Consequently this place could be really reckoned as "property"; it had
a money value, and was...

Page 200

...made,
all by her small self, to make a whole vast despondent Alpine desolation
stop breaking its...

Page 201

...from the high plateau of the St. Theodule glacier,
and fall headlong over precipitous rocks till...

Page 202

...in the lead cut steps in the ice with his hatchet, and as fast
as he...

Page 203

...On
these occasions Peter would take my hand, and each of us stretching as
far as we...

Page 204

...the Altels this time. I
said Alp-climbing was a different thing from what I had supposed...

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...dissolved jewelry is not good stuff to drink.

We were surrounded by a hideous desolation. We...

Page 206

...and rubbish into the
bottom abyss; and I noticed that upon these occasions the rider, whether
male...

Page 207

...relays of strong
porters. The motion is easier than that of any other conveyance. We met
a...

Page 208

...things--yes, he saw them all. He saw them
all, just as I have told you."

After another...

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...all for display, I am all
for the simple right, even though I lose money by...

Page 210

..."tight," but doing his best to appear sober. He
took up a _corked_ bottle of wine,...

Page 211

...this great lady came in and sat down between them and
me and blotted out my...

Page 212

...its mighty towers, all its lines and all
its details vaguely suggest human architecture. There are...

Page 213

...the train for
Visp. There we shouldered our knapsacks and things, and set out on foot,
in...

Page 214

...garment. They gave my bobtail coat
to somebody else, and sent me an ulster suitable for...

Page 215

...cost; we rear an edifice
which is an adornment to the town, and we gild it,...

Page 216

...get away from that
bell. By and by we had a fine spectacle on our right....

Page 217

...torpid one; but you take
a Protestant canton: windows perfectly lovely with flowers--and as for
cats, there's...

Page 218

...laughing.

We went forward and examined the place and saw the long tracks which her
feet had...

Page 219

...moving through a steadily thickening
double row of pictures of it, done in oil, water, chromo,...

Page 220

...never been found. The secret of his
sepulture, like that of Moses, must remain a mystery...

Page 221

...I have thought the thing all out, and am quite sure I am
right. A born...

Page 222

...have saved him all trouble. One must have from one hundred
and fifty to five hundred...

Page 223

...fell back on to
the snow with motion arrested. My head fortunately came the right side
up,...

Page 224

...But I turned a deaf ear to all he said.
When he perceived at last that...

Page 225

...ETC. APPARATUS

16 Cases Hams 25 Spring Mattresses 2 Barrels Flour 2 Hair ditto 22
Barrels Whiskey  ...

Page 226

...who would be
assembled in front of the hotels to see us pass, and also out...

Page 227

...time, and they considered that a suspicious sign.

Plainly we were in an ugly fix. The...

Page 228

...recorded by the instrument, during the whole time.
Words cannot describe the comfort that that friendly,...

Page 229

...any estimate in figures, how high the experimenter went.

We had nothing to do, now, but...

Page 230

...Twice or thrice we seemed to get the signal, and a shout was
just ready to...

Page 231

...thirst for vengeance usually inspires. But after a
tiresome march of almost half a mile, we...

Page 232

...and us. To avert suspicion, he had
judged it best that the line should continue to...

Page 233

...remedy, when Harris came to me with a Baedeker
map which showed conclusively that the mountain...

Page 234

...So I transferred the new barometer to the cooking
department, to be used for the official...

Page 235

...in the future the
chamois must not be hunted within limits of the camp with any...

Page 236

...a good deal more
picturesque than it was before, too. The man said we were now...

Page 237

...efforts and greatly admired them, and
when I heard you were here, I ..."

I indicated a...

Page 238

...It is surprising. How does it come?

G.S. My grandfather's name is a passport to all...

Page 239

...at the Nile cataracts"--and at that very moment they will be
surprised to learn that I'm...

Page 240

...the summit before night, but for a delay caused by
the loss of an umbrella. I...

Page 241

...is_. Our ascent itself was a great achievement, but this
contribution to science was an inconceivably...

Page 242

...of the
Riffelberg. Therefore, let the tourist rope himself up and go there; for
I have shown...

Page 243

...to arnica and paregoric.

My men are being restored to health and strength, my main perplexity,
now,...

Page 244

...the appointment,
whereas his conscience would bear him witness that he had not sought it
at all,...

Page 245

...what the reader
has by this time guessed: the most magnificent idea that was ever
conceived had...

Page 246

...was not a leak at all. This boulder had
descended from a precipice and stopped on...

Page 247

...it take a different gait from this."

I said I was sure he would increase the...

Page 248

...proved that the primeval Swiss was not
the dull savage he is represented to have been,...

Page 249

...man, whether he was hurt or unhurt. These cracks do not go
straight down; one can...

Page 250

...front of it, like a long grave or a
long, sharp roof. This is called a...

Page 251

...Mr. Whymper refers to a case
which occurred in Iceland in 1721:

"It seems that in the...

Page 252

...not only said the glacier moved, but they timed its
movement. They ciphered out a glacier's...

Page 253

...of the sack were spread upon a long
table, and officially inventoried, as follows:

Portions of three...

Page 254

...had come and gone in a single
moment, leaving no mark of their passage. Time had...

Page 255

...months before the first remains
were found, a Chamonix guide named Balmat--a relative of one of...

Page 256

...morning. We were eight in number--Croz
(guide), old Peter Taugwalder (guide) and his two sons; Lord...

Page 257

...It was a place which any fair mountaineer might pass in safety.
We bore away nearly...

Page 258

...next advanced, and so on. They had
not, however, attached the additional rope to rocks, and...

Page 259

...not
only incapable of giving assistance, but were in such a state that a
slip might have...

Page 260

...then, for they do
not bury one body on top of another. As I understand it,...

Page 261

...still a steep part--that is, he was not
skinning the front of his farm, but the...

Page 262

...in simply a natural and characteristic way. They were roped together
with a string, they had...

Page 263

...was so much modesty in him; I should have expected
him to be either Adam or...

Page 264

...from
Australia, and reaching the company in the form mentioned above gave
rise to the mistake.

I had...

Page 265

...was a charming
view of rocky buttresses and wooded heights. There was a liberal
allowance of pretty...

Page 266

...to get drunk.

When we drove off, the driver said all the tourists had arrived and
gone...

Page 267

...booming torrent, whose music was loud
and strong; we could not see this torrent, for it...

Page 268

...the inkiest
silhouette, while it rested against the moon. The unillumined peaks and
minarets, hovering vague and...

Page 269

...extortion: the law states what you are to pay.
The guides serve in rotation; you cannot...

Page 270

...his license taken away from him at the dropping
of a handkerchief; if France refused to...

Page 271

...a paying property. His articles in
_Blackwood_ and his lectures on Mont Blanc in London advertised...

Page 272

...offered to let
Prof. H----y publish my great theory as his own discovery; I even begged
him...

Page 273

...reigns, he notices a sullen, distant, continuous
roar in his ears, which is like what he...

Page 274

...that
same old pause, and right after it that thump on the floor once more.
I said,...

Page 275

...Blanc, merely to be able to say I had done
it, and I believed the telescope...

Page 276

...perils which beset us were
so great that at times I was minded to turn back....

Page 277

...all around the curving horizon
the eye roved over a troubled sea of sun-kissed Alps, and...

Page 278

...are dark stories of his getting advance
payers on the summit and then leaving them there...

Page 279

...of their brother, who seemed entirely inert. Chamonix's
affairs stood still; everybody was in the street,...

Page 280

...cabin. They carried food and cordials for the refreshment of their
predecessors; they took lanterns with...

Page 281

...years, when a Mlle. d'Angeville made the ascent--1838. In
Chamonix I picked up a rude old...

Page 282

...flesh and
spirit, as it were, to the presence of these men during their last hours
of...

Page 283

...porters and ascended to the Hotel
des Pyramides, which is perched on the high moraine which...

Page 284

...than a day, but I would counsel the unpracticed--if not pressed
for time--to allow themselves two....

Page 285

...implored admittance--and was refused! A few days
before, the adulations and applauses of a nation were...

Page 286

...lukewarm;
but no matter, ice could not help it; it is incurably flat, incurably
insipid. It is...

Page 287

...where
one in 1,000 of America's population dies, two in 1,000 of the other
populations of the...

Page 288

...was
five miles wide, and quite level.

We reached the hotel before nine o'clock. Next morning we...

Page 289

...but monsieur, they are so beautiful!"

I confessed it, but said they were not suitable for...

Page 290

...another error. This was "_Purgatory_ street."
After a little I said, "_now_ I've got the right...

Page 291

...venture to claim one little matter of superiority in our
manners; a lady may traverse our...

Page 292

...a boy (also asleep) taking care of
them.

From queer old-fashioned windows along the curve projected boxes...

Page 293

...bully and abuse an unprotected lady who has
lost the use of her limbs and cannot...

Page 294

...required no fire in the parlor, for I think one might as well
have tried to...

Page 295

...me much because they did
not put in anything. I had no Italian money, so I...

Page 296

...I was out with the Innocents Abroad,
the ship stopped in the Russian port of Odessa...

Page 297

...heart. Then I
sped away in a guilty hurry, and even when I was a mile...

Page 298

...and shipped the clothes to the hotel. He said he
did not keep two suits of...

Page 299

...noble cathedral, where long shafts
of tinted light were cleaving through the solemn dimness from the...

Page 300

...the large picture where the Emperor
(Barbarossa?) is prostrate before the Pope, there are three men...

Page 301

...beautiful, but only to such as know her; it is a beauty
which cannot be formulated,...

Page 302

...One year ago
I could not have appreciated it. My study of Art in Heidelberg has...

Page 303

...feet of turmoil and racket and
insubordination. This latter state of things is not an accident,...

Page 304

...contrast
the impassioned fervor of the hasp. The highlights in this part of the
work are cleverly...

Page 305

...distress, without knowing
why. But one is calm before St. Mark's, one is calm within it,...

Page 306

...our day it would be immoral to go on
the highway to get bricks for a...

Page 307

...was about to slip a
stiletto into him when Crioni saved himself by explaining that that...

Page 308

...it in Europe, but they don't know
how to cook it. Neither will they cut it...

Page 309

...monotonous
variety of _unstriking_ dishes. It is an inane dead-level of
"fair-to-middling." There is nothing to _accent_...

Page 310

...Sheep-head and croakers, from New Orleans.
Black bass from the Mississippi. American roast beef. Roast turkey,
Thanksgiving...

Page 311

...the
ashes but one layer; butter that one and eat.

N.B.--No household should ever be without this...

Page 312

...now. Yes, every one of
them. Nobody noticed their nakedness before, perhaps; nobody can help
noticing it...

Page 313

...two Venuses in
the Tribune; persons who have seen them will easily remember which one I
am...

Page 314

...cities--then to Munich,
and thence to Paris--partly for exercise, but mainly because these
things were in our...

Page 315

...languages; he is your surest help and refuge in time of
trouble or perplexity. He is...

Page 316

...calls a hack when you want one;
puts you into it; tells the driver whither to...

Page 317

...if you gave him too little he might
neglect you afterward, and if you gave him...

Page 318

...of Saratoga, Long Branch, New York, and similar centers of
resort, would be one which the...

Page 319

...about it, either. But the Hotel de Ville's
old excellent reputation still keeps its dreary rooms...

Page 320

...is
clothed with a clinging garment of polished ivy which hides the wounds
and stains of time....

Page 321

...the slop, the darkness,
and the deluge. We waded along for three-quarters of a mile, and...

Page 322

...toward extinction.

While we still gazed and enjoyed, the ruin was suddenly enveloped in
rolling and rumbling...

Page 323

...when you wanted one, you could stroll to the Castle, and
burrow among its dungeons, or...

Page 324

...government matter of
it?'

"Where could he get a cask large enough to contain the right proportion
of...

Page 325

...his matriculation
card, whereupon the officer asks for his address, then goes his way, and
reports the...

Page 326

...He said he would appoint
the very first day he could spare.

His confinement was to endure...

Page 327

...and a narrow wooden bedstead with a villainous straw mattress,
but no sheets, pillows, blankets, or...

Page 328

...for not saluting
him. Another had "here two days slept and three nights lain awake,"
on account...

Page 329

...their work on it. Persons who
saw it at the auction said it was so curiously...

Page 330

...German. I spoke
entirely in that language. He was greatly interested; and after I had
talked a...

Page 331

...science, I will cipher it out on the hypothesis that it is
masculine. Very well--then _the_...

Page 332

...suppose that this closing hurrah is in the
nature of the flourish to a man's signature--not...

Page 333

...he starts out
to say that a man met a counselor's wife in the street, and...

Page 334

...whenever a person says
_sie_ to me, I generally try to kill him, if a stranger.

Now...

Page 335

...ill afford loss, has bought and paid for two dogs and only got one
of them,...

Page 336

...heart, and conscience
haven't any sex at all. The inventor of the language probably got what
he...

Page 337

...see the Snow, how he drifts along, and of the Mud, how
deep he is! Ah...

Page 338

...the similarities of look and sound between words which have
no similarity in meaning are a...

Page 339

...Passage, Stroke, Touch, Line, Flourish, Trait of
Character, Feature, Lineament, Chess-move, Organ-stop, Team, Whiff,
Bias, Drawer, Propensity,...

Page 340

...page--and if he has any imagination
he can see the banners and hear the music, too....

Page 341

...of saying "Mr. Simmons, clerk of the
county and district courts, was in town yesterday," the...

Page 342

...only
stay and support was gone, and he faded away and died.

3. It merely means, in...

Page 343

...in any and all
forms, from mere kindly feeling and honest good will toward the passing
stranger,...

Page 344

...would move the Verb further up to the front. You
may load up with ever so...

Page 345

...be punishable with death.

And eighthly, and last, I would retain _zug_ and _schlag_, with their
pendants,...

Page 346

...by the true patriots of all climes and
nationalities--a day which offers a fruitful theme for...

Page 347

...Reikmann, who lived in Heidelberg. All Germany was proud of the
venerable scholar, who lived in...

Page 348

...Givenaught, go to
the Herr Heartless, ask them to come and bid.' There, did I not...

Page 349

...of Herr
Givenaught. He heard her story, and said--

"I am sorry for you, my child, but...

Page 350

...of the crowd at the other
end of the room. The people near by turned, and...

Page 351

...of Hamburg, Frankfort, Baden, Munich, and Augsburg
are all constructed on the same general plan. I...

Page 352

...of them. He
soon convinces you that even these matters can be handled in such a...

Page 353

...any
malice I wish to compare this journal, published in a German city of
170,000 inhabitants, with...

Page 354

...is
coming back from Russia, two lines; the Landtag will meet at ten o'clock
in the morning...

Page 355

...give him bread. His
long-continued tortures and deprivations destroyed him at last, on the
third of January....