A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Part 7.

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT

...

Page 1

...of doors. Toward noon the guests arrived, and we assembled
under a great tree and...

Page 2

...like
to lose my character, the neighbors wending I had mayhap been
stealing. It was a...

Page 3

...around on the company with
the satisfaction of a god who is doing the handsome and...

Page 4

...son emerged from space and said he had come
to collect.

"That's all right," I said, indifferently....

Page 5

.... . . . . . . . 3,000
8 stools ....

Page 6

...a situation together better, or got happier spectacular
effects out of the materials available. The...

Page 7

...dulled down to drowsiness
and went off to take a nap. Mrs. Marco cleared the...

Page 8

...What do you pay for beer?"

"It costeth us eight and one-half milrays the pint."

"We get...

Page 9

...is true that with you a good mechanic
is allowed about three dollars and a half...

Page 10

...to us and
work 32 days at _half_ the wages; he can buy all those things...

Page 11

...I'm going to hit him
at all, I'm going to hit him a lifter. And...

Page 12

...board besides--such as it is:
it won't bloat them. Two hundred and fifty years later--pay...

Page 13

...says the unwritten law--the 'combine' will be the
other way, and then how these fine people's...

Page 14

...world? The
mob try to have some fun with him, don't they?"

"Yes."

"They begin by clodding...

Page 15

...day, he
shall be both fined and pilloried for it; and whoever knows he did
it and...

Page 16

...was in when my pile-driver fell, the toy still gripped in his
unconscious fingers. So...

Page 17

...if we were
conspiring. So I had to sit there and look calm and pleasant...

Page 18

...George for
Britain!" and he downed the wheelwright. The mason was big, but
I laid him...

Page 19

...they didn't. No doubt the dogs had found
the place where we had entered the...

Page 20

...to send
a man up it."

"Marry, that we will do!"

I was obliged to admire my cuteness...

Page 21

...and foliage, and were not visible from
any good aiming point. If they would but...

Page 22

...unacquainted
here. We have purposed no harm; and yet but for your brave
interference and protection...

Page 23

...So they had
been dragging their chains about, all this weary time. That poor
husband was...

Page 24

...were time ye learned
them. Ye are strangers to us; ye will not deny that....

Page 25

...We
took up our line of march and passed out of Cambenet at noon;
and it seemed...

Page 26

...he ought to have brought twenty-five dollars;
whereas I was quite well aware that in all...

Page 27

...such a thing as a slave who will remain a man
till he dies; whose bones...

Page 28

...village we were making
for. Almost instantly we were shut up as in a fog,...

Page 29

...kingdom seemed
to be comprehended in it; and all drunk at that. In the van...

Page 30

...he was
doing his whole duty, he worked early and late at his handicraft,
his bread was...

Page 31

...poor child, I did not know it was death!' and fell as a
tree falls. ...