A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Part 6.

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT

...

Page 1

...by the roadside, and then
gave him a morsel or two to stay his stomach with....

Page 2

...it was such a thundering poor success that
it raised wondering scowls all along the line,...

Page 3

...our condition are not allowed to carry arms. What
would a lord say--yes, or any...

Page 4

...eyes spread slowly open,
and lift the earth's entire atmosphere as much as an inch! ...

Page 5

...exigencies of life, but they are no use in professional
work. It is the restfulest...

Page 6

...any other noble knight
in time to judiciously save him the trouble? The knights paid
no...

Page 7

...This information did him no damage, because it
left him as intelligent as he was before....

Page 8

...Look at me, please--this is
what I mean.... Now you are getting it; that is...

Page 9

...seat for one."

The king looked puzzled--he wasn't a very heavy weight, intellectually.
His head was an...

Page 10

...have whistled.
Words realize nothing, vivify nothing to you, unless you have
suffered in your own person...

Page 11

...pushed the door softly open and looked in.
I made out some dim forms, and a...

Page 12

...where be such as need succor. Peace, I will
not go. It is you...

Page 13

...his--my young soft hand, not this
withered claw. Ah, yes, to go, and know it...

Page 14

...and not left
the poor thing forsaken--"

"She lieth at peace," interrupted the king, in a subdued...

Page 15

...Our three grown sons ran frightened to report the crime.
Well, in his lordship's dungeon there...

Page 16

... But the
end came yesterday; my strength broke down. Yesterday was the
last time I...

Page 17

...to demur; but just then we heard
the door give way, and knew that those desolate...

Page 18

...the
subject--and even then an outside matter did it for me. This was
a something which...

Page 19

...limb of a tree! That is,
it seemed to be writhing, but it was not....

Page 20

...we had put this place some
miles behind us. Then we asked hospitality at the...

Page 21

...and from these people the suspicion easily extended
itself to their relatives and familiars. A...

Page 22

...the natural
and proper and rightful thing for that poor devil's whole caste
to side with the...

Page 23

...On the road
the man pulled his resolution together, and began the march with
a steady gait,...

Page 24

...about seemingly
sorrowing, and shedding the hypocrite's tear, for in that lies
safety. I have said...

Page 25

...twelve or fourteen years
old. They implored help, but they were so beside themselves that
we...

Page 26

...Marco,
the son of Marco, was haggling with a shopkeeper over a quarter
of a pound of...

Page 27

...he was getting rich,
hand over fist, and was vastly respected. Marco was very proud...

Page 28

...back from the village; for although he wouldn't be likely
to say such a thing to...

Page 29

...may not be, brother, it may not be.
Consider the vastness of the sum--"

"Hang the vastness...

Page 30

...him to see if he
could read it. He could, and was proud to show...