A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Part 4.

By Mark Twain

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...A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT

...

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...their son, Prince Uwaine. Stretching down the hall
from this, was the general table, on...

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...as
any that was sung that night.

By midnight everybody was fagged out, and sore with laughing;...

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...the measureless dim vacancies of
space. Well, well, well, they _were_ a superstitious lot. ...

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...cords all down my legs were hurting in sympathy with that
man's pain. Conducted by...

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...picture that will not go
from me; I wish it would. A native young giant...

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...if you want to. Do anything
you're a mind to; don't mind me."

Why, her eyes...

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...your story, then?"

"Ye had made no promise; else had it been otherwise."

"I see, I see.......

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...many minutes at a time; it has never been my
way to bother much about things...

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...sense on her. Training--training is
everything; training is all there is _to_ a person. ...

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...not
able to utter it, trained as I had been. The best I could do...

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...started
with. I suppose that in the beginning I prized it, because we
prize anything that...

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...only looked up at us once or twice,
through a cobweb of tangled hair, as if...

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...and ankles were
cicatrices, old smooth scars, and fastened to the stone on which
he sat was...

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...spite;
and not always the queen's by any means, but a friend's. The newest
prisoner's crime...

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...body and preserver of the intellect. This man was in pretty
good condition yet. ...

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...of
tradition the only thing that could be proven was that none of
the five had seen...

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...just like her to try
to do it with an axe.



CHAPTER XIX

KNIGHT-ERRANTRY AS A TRADE

Sandy and...

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...came the four sons by couples, and two of them brake
their spears, and so did...

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...endlong
and overthwart--"

"There's no use in beating about the bush and trying to get around
it that...

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...of shining gold was writ:

"USE PETERSON'S PROPHYLACTIC TOOTH-BRUSH--ALL THE GO."

I was...

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...the
unprofane fragments of his statement, that he had chanced upon
Sir Ossaise at dawn of the...

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...her face.

It was a curious situation; yet it is not on that account that
I have...

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...also while I was creeping to her side on
my knees. Her eyes were burning...

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...my delusion, for when I know that an ostensible hog is a
lady, that is enough...

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...her fling herself upon those
hogs, with tears of joy running down her cheeks, and strain...

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...delicious! but that was as far as I could get--sleep was out of
the question for...

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...the natives of
her island, ancient and modern, have always felt for rank, let its
outward casket...

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...the regions of the earth!
Each must hie to her own home; wend you we might...

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...worth while, and would moreover be a rather grave departure
from custom, and therefore likely to...

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...the
godly hermits and drink of the miraculous waters and be cleansed
from sin."

"Where is this watering...

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...was in that
moment appeased, and the waters gushed richly forth again, and even
unto this day...

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...whether of youth or age. Yet both
were here, both age and youth; gray old...

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...was written in the dust upon their
faces, plain to see, and lord, how plain to...

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...smith; and now arrived a landed
proprietor who had bought this girl a few miles back,...

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...got me from Camelot."

"Why, you have certainly done nobly, Sir Ozana. Where have you
been...

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...as mist upon
a copper mirror an ye count not the barrel of sweat he sweateth
betwixt...

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...every monk and published itself in his
ghastly face. Everywhere, these black-robed, soft-sandaled,
tallow-visaged specters appeared,...

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...well with a malicious
enchantment which would balk me until I found out its secret.
It might...

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...bellowed out
in a mighty chorus that drowned the boom of the tolling bells.

At last I...

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...everything by incantations;
he never worked his intellect. If he had stepped in there and...

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...or thirty
feet of the chain showed wear and use, the rest of it was unworn
and...

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...would like to do that myself. This is Wednesday. Is there
a matinee?"

"A which,...

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...technicalities upon the
untutored infant of the sixth and then rail at her because she
couldn't get...

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...wonder, and envious of the fleckless sanctity which
these pious austerities had won for them from...

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...hauled aft with a back-stay and triced up with
a half-turn in the standing rigging forward...