A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Part 1.

By Mark Twain

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...A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT

...

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...I came across the curious stranger
whom I am going to talk about. He attracted...

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...Sir Thomas Malory's enchanting book, and
fed at its rich feast of prodigies and adventures, breathed...

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...a good-will,
and there he had good cheer for him and his horse.
...

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...me, but so that ye yield
you unto Sir Kay the seneschal, on...

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...a fourth persuader, he drifted into it himself, in a quite
simple and natural way:



THE STRANGER'S...

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...for--"

"What are you giving me?" I said. "Get along back to your circus,
or I'll...

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...treasure. The first part
of it--the great bulk of it--was parchment, and yellow with age.
I...

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...too, that was surprising in one so young.
There was food for thought here. I...

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...and a gay display of moving and intermingling colors, and
an altogether pleasant stir and noise...

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...beginning
of the year 513.

It made the cold chills creep over me! I stopped and...

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...all it is worth, even
if it's only two pair and a jack. I made...

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...sat down by me.

Well, it was a curious kind of spectacle, and interesting. It was
an...

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...balusters with the same object; and all broke into
delighted ejaculations from time to time. In...

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...and say simultaneously, "I can lick you,"
and go at it on the spot; but I...

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...inquiry upon Sir Kay. But he
was equal to the occasion. He got up and...

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...table upon unsteady legs, and feebly swaying his ancient
head and surveying the company with his...

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... And as they rode, Arthur said,
I have no sword. No force,* [*Footnote from...

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...I a sword, now will I wage
battle with him, and be avenged on him. ...

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...din and
turmoil; at which every man and woman of the multitude laughed
till the tears flowed,...

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...order that so strange a curiosity as I was might be exhibited
to the wonder and...

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...that they were indecent and I had presence
of mind enough not to mention it.

They were...

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...for I knew by past experience of the lifelike intensity
of dreams, that to be burned...

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...it is too late!"

Now this strange exhibition gave me a good idea and set me...

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...a creature so terrified, so unnerved, so
demoralized. But he promised everything; and on my...

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...frighted even to the marrow,
and was minded to give order for your instant enlargement, and
that...

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...to
supplement knowledge. The mere knowledge of a fact is pale; but
when you come to...

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...There was no help for me. I was dazed, stupefied;
I had no command over...

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...you
shall see them go mad with fear; and they will set you free and
make you...

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...Merlin, the other from the king. Merlin started
from his place--to apply the torch himself,...

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...it; but
he was sure; he knew it was the 21st. So, that feather-headed
boy had...

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...he had done
under excitement; therefore I would let the darkness grow a while,
and if at...